ACROSS THE UNIVERSE

At once gritty, whimsical and highly theatrical, Revolution Studios’ Across the Universe is a groundbreaking movie musical, springing from the imagination of renowned writer-director Julie Taymor (Frida, Titus, and the Broadway smash hit musical “The Lion King”) and writers Dick Clement & Ian La Frenais (The Commitments), that brings together an original story and 33 revolutionary songs – including “Hey Jude,” “I Am the Walrus,” and “All You Need is Love” – that defined a generation. Taymor says, “The idea was to create an original musical using only the songs of the Beatles.”

A love story set against the backdrop of the 1960s amid the turbulent years of anti-war protest, mind exploration and rock 'n roll, the film moves from the dockyards of Liverpool to the creative psychedelia of Greenwich Village, from the riot-torn streets of Detroit to the killing fields of Vietnam. The star-crossed lovers, Jude (Jim Sturgess) and Lucy (Evan Rachel Wood), along with a small group of friends and musicians, are swept up into the emerging anti-war and counterculture movements, with “Dr. Robert” (Bono) and “Mr. Kite” (Eddie Izzard) as their guides. Tumultuous forces outside their control ultimately tear the young lovers apart, forcing Jude and Lucy – against all odds – to find their own way back to each other.

Revolution Studios presents a Matthew Gross/Team Todd production, a film by Julie Taymor, Across the Universe, starring Evan Rachel Wood, Jim Sturgess, and Joe Anderson. The film is directed by Julie Taymor. The producers are Suzanne Todd, Jennifer Todd, and Matthew Gross. The screenplay is by Dick Clement & Ian La Frenais, from a story by Julie Taymor & Dick Clement & Ian La Frenais. Executive producers are Derek Dauchy, Rudd Simmons, and Charles Newirth. Director of photography is Bruno Delbonnel, A.F.C. The production designer is Mark Friedberg. The editor is Françoise Bonnot, A.C.E. The choreography is by Daniel Ezralow. The original score is by Elliot Goldenthal. The songs are produced by T Bone Burnett, Elliot Goldenthal, and Teese Gohl. The costume designer is Albert Wolsky. Co-producers are Richard Barratta and Ben Haber. Casting by Bernard Telsey, CSA. Columbia Pictures distributes.

 

The film also features cameos by such notable stars as U2’s Bono, Salma Hayek, Eddie Izzard and singer Joe Cocker.

Across the Universe has been rated PG-13 by the MPAA for Some Drug Content, Nudity, Sexuality, Violence, and Language. The film will be released in limited engagements on September 14, 2007, and expands on September 21, 2007.

 

 

INVESTIGATING THE ‘60s

Julie Taymor, the groundbreaking visionary behind Revolution Studios’ new film Across the Universe, says that she first conceived a film that would, in her words, “investigate the ‘60s. It had to penetrate all levels of the Beatles’ songs. From the love songs to the political songs, the music and the film would not just reflect the microcosm of a character’s experience, but, from my perspective, would also represent the macrocosm of the events that are happening in the world.”

For Taymor, though the film is set a generation back, making the story and the film fresh and alive for today’s audiences was the entire point. “I really want young people to see the passion in this movie – to see with what fervor these characters invested themselves into social movements as well as self-exploration,” she says. “I hope it really speaks ‘across the universe’ and across cultures... that anybody could identify with the situations and the events that are happening in this movie.”

 

According to producer Jennifer Todd, the film is an artistic statement from Taymor. “In addition to being a unique voice, Julie is the hardest-working director I’ve ever worked with,” she says. “It’s an amazingly satisfying experience to work with someone who lives and breathes the movie morning, noon, and night. One particular weekend, we went away and came back to discover that an entire new sequence had been invented. Because she’s like that, she attracts people who want to work just as hard to achieve her vision.”

 

Producer Matthew Gross, who generated the project, concurs. “Julie is a national treasure,” he says. “She is a true artist – not only does she bring visual appeal, but she has just the right touch with the singers and dancers, which was so necessary for this film. The work she did in Titus and Frida show her incredible vision. In addition, because everyone wants to work with Julie Taymor – and with good reason – she is able to attract top artists and amazing talent to work with her. She is a tremendous asset to the film in every way.”

 

Unlike most musicals, where a story comes first and songs are inserted in at key points, the songs created the story. “Beginning with over 200 songs written by the Beatles, we eventually chose 33 that we felt best told the story of a generation and a time,” says Taymor.

 

 

Todd explains, “The film is an original musical and it has an original story – one you’ve never seen before, inspired by Beatles’ music in a way that you haven’t heard before.”

 

“The entire concept of this musical,” Taymor explains, “is that the lyrics will tell the story. They are the libretto, they are the arias, they are the emotion of the characters.”

Although Taymor was only in her early teens in the 1960s, the story was inspired by her childhood observations:

“Lucy and Max, the brother and sister, are modeled slightly after my own older brother and sister, and I’m Julia, the young girl who’s watching. During that time, I was a voyeur to what my parents were going through with teenagers and then college students who were going through the radical political movement: the draft, the hippies, the drugs. And so I was there – I didn’t get immersed myself, but I watched it.”

Taymor admired the outspoken spirit of the time. “People really took chances,” she says. “As Lucy says, ‘I’d lie down in front of a tank if it would bring my brother home from the war.’ And of course Jude responds, ‘But it wouldn’t,’ and she gets upset and she says, ‘Does that mean you don’t think I should try?’ I’m so moved by the fact that at that time, people would try.”

 

But Taymor definitely did not view the project as a piece of nostalgia. She notes that many of the issues facing young people in the ‘60s are still very relevant today. The filmmakers’ goal was to translate the passion and feeling of the 60s and have it resonate in a way that made it feel as contemporary as possible. The reason to make a film like this, in her mind, was the immediacy of the themes. “You constantly have to revisit these stories in order to reflect upon your present and really think, ‘What is it that’s different now?’” Taymor says. “That era is explicitly important to our time now.”

In order to bring the era to life, Taymor and screenwriters Dick Clement & Ian La Frenais created an entirely new story, using the songs to guide their way. “Characters were created for the songs,” Taymor continues. “For example, the character Prudence: I loved the idea of taking ‘I Want to Hold Your Hand’ and giving it to an innocent cheerleader in Ohio.”

The song begins with the young girl singing plaintively on the sidelines of the football field. “We don’t change the lyrics,” says Taymor, “but partway through, you realize she’s not in love with the quarterback – she’s in love with the blonde cheerleader. All of the sudden the song works in a totally different way, because it’s about repressed love. By the end of the song, this young girl, who doesn’t even know what she’s feeling, leaves home. She hitchhikes her way to New York City. Without having to go into the background of the character, without having to see her mother and her father and her life story, the song says it all.”

 

“As we went through the journeys of characters, songs came up,” Taymor continues. “In the story, Max is going to be drafted into the Army. I went through dozens of songs until finally I got to ‘I Want You’ and it registered in my head, ‘My God, “I Want You,” isn’t that the Uncle Sam motto?’” It was a perfect fit.

As the story began to grow, in this organic way, Taymor would follow the songs where they led her. In many cases, the songs would move to other characters and take on multiple meanings, as in the case of “I Want You,” which starts with Max’s army induction and continues to a more erotic scene between the characters of Jo-Jo and Sadie. In some cases, the songs seemed more like private moments, and in the manner of an aria in an opera, expressed inner thoughts.

In still other cases, like “Revolution,” the directness of the lyrics led them to portray the emotion of a scene in a stronger way than dialogue could. “When Jude sings ‘Revolution,’ he’s actually breaking into the Students For Democratic Reform office, going right up to Lucy, and using the emotion of the music and those lyrics to express himself instead of saying it just with straight dialogue,” notes Taymor. “He keeps singing because he’s in a state of being that is beyond the everyday; he’s in a heightened state that’s going to get him beat up and thrown out by the end of the song. It really helps us encapsulate time, because the music helps you to go very quickly through an emotional state and get to another level that is very, very heightened and very dramatic.”

 

ABOUT THE CAST AND THE CAMEO PERFORMANCES

With the characters created from the raw material of the songs, the filmmakers placed an imperative on choosing the best actors and singers they could find for the roles.

As a result, the only cast member with major film experience is Evan Rachel Wood. Taymor notes, “She’s so young and nobody really has seen her grow into a woman – in this movie, she grows into a full-fledged adult, serious woman. She’s going to be a major discovery for people. Plus, no one even knew she could sing.”

Among all the songs she sings in Across the Universe, the one she looked forward to most as the greatest challenge was “If I Fell.” “I’ve never had any training in singing, and that song goes very, very high. It’s also the most emotional song I sing. So I had to prepare myself emotionally for the character at that moment and also put it into song – while also remembering what my voice had to do,” says Wood. “As I was learning the song and trying to figure out how to sing it, they brought Jim Sturgess into the room so I could sing it to him. It was the very best I ever sang it – it took my mind off what I was doing and freed me up.”

Wood notes that she shared not only a connection with Sturgess, but with the entire cast – and that it was reciprocal. “Julie knows how to cast a movie,” she says, “and she knew that we would work well together because we’re all very similar. During production, I’d felt like I’d gained brothers and sisters; they’re all such interesting people and they all have great life stories.”

 

Open casting calls were held in England for the role of Jude. Taymor said she could tell from a tape of Jim Sturgess that he was the one, even before she met him in person.

Taymor and her longtime collaborator, composer Elliot Goldenthal, were very particular about what kind of voices they wanted, she explains. “We did not want musical theater voices, and we didn’t want pop-y voices. Jim just fit in right away. Jim’s been in a rock band and he’s an actor. He just sings with such an incredible ease that you feel that the character is talking just to you. He has a beautiful voice – and there’s no disconnect between when his speaking voice and his singing voice. Jim can go right from talking to singing.”

Sturgess says that he is fortunate to be making his major-studio debut in Across the Universe and to be working with no less a talent than Julie Taymor. “She’s brilliant,” he says. “She’s an endless head of ideas. She has a definite idea of what she wants to see, but also allows her actors the room to bring their own ideas – she just takes it all in.”

Working with the stars playing the cameo roles in the film was also an eye-opening experience. “One day, I was sitting around, watching Bono sing ‘I am the Walrus’ – so I was already having a good afternoon – and then he comes over and asks me if I’d like to come to his show at the end of the week. What was I going to say? ‘Sorry, I have other plans?’ No, I stood there and said, ‘I’d love to, thank you… Mr. Bono.” Another highlight for Sturgess was the day Bono came to set and told the young actor that he liked Sturgess’s voice.

Max is an American, but Taymor did not find an American actor that had the qualities she wanted for the part. When she met Joe Anderson, another Brit, she found it interesting that he did not even want to audition for the role of Jude: “When I went to London he auditioned for me, but he said, you know, “I’m not that character – I am Max,” so even he knew that his own personality would be better suited to that. And he looked like Evan, so he was really the right mix to play her brother.”

 

For Sadie, says Taymor, “I knew Dana Fuchs and I created the part for her. Dana had done a demo for Elliot for another project, and she has that voice that you haven’t heard since Janis.”

Fuchs says, “I felt like I was in a movie when I was on the phone with Julie and she was telling me that I got the part. There was no one there to witness. I was shocked – on top of getting the part, to find out she wrote it for me was amazing. She said there was no other Sadie.”

Sadie’s partner in the movie is the character of Jo-Jo, who is also a musician. “He comes from Detroit, comes from soul music, and hooks up with these young strays and he becomes part of Sadie’s band. He transforms in front of you, going from the slicked-back hair to the wild afro.” To play Jo-Jo, Taymor called upon Martin Luther McCoy, a singer and a guitar player in New York without much acting experience. Taymor says that he proved himself to be “a phenomenal actor” as well as musician.

T.V. Carpio, who plays Prudence, was another discovery. Along with having a beautiful singing voice, T.V. is a dancer and former ice skater. “I had Prudence become a skating horse in the circus scenes because she could ice skate. Then, I thought, ‘Well, she’ll be the cheerleader, instead of just watching the cheerleader, because she’s so good physically,” says Taymor. “As you get to know the actors, you create more and more for them.”

The feeling was mutual. Carpio recalls, “As Jim said to me, in the very beginning: ‘I’m just desperate to do what Julie needs from us.’ We wanted so much to make her vision come alive. When she would tell us what she saw, it would never be just what’s written on a piece of paper – it would be something just completely out of this world... we were so honored to be a part of that. We couldn’t even believe that this is our job.”

 

Wood agrees. “Julie really brings out the best in you,” she says. “She can make you do things that you never knew you could do. I love how she brings that out of people. You can’t be afraid and you can’t have any fear. She throws you into the deep end and somehow you’re just in there and you swim there, and you realize, ‘I didn’t know I could do this.’”

The cast was rounded out with some very special guests in supporting roles. Bono, who was in the middle of a world tour with U2, managed to fit in two days on set as “Dr. Robert.” He played Madison Square Garden late into the night before each of his early morning calls. “We concocted the character together, me and Julie,” says the rock star, activist, and first-time actor. “She wanted him to be true to the time and period, so we made him a west coast, Neal Cassady type.” Cassady, of course, was the inspiration for Jack Kerouac’s On the Road; a key figure in the 60s counterculture, he was also an author in his own right and the driver of Furthur, Ken Kesey’s Merry Pranksters bus). “We studied film of him and the way he worked, and it’s almost like he wanted to be a rock star – he has all these jerky moves, a lot of self-confidence, always plays to the women in the room. For my first acting role, I thought this would be interesting and a little bit special.”

Salma Hayek, Taymor’s friend and Oscar®-nominated star of Frida, plays the sexy dancing nurses in “Happiness is a Warm Gun.” Taymor asked Hayek if she wanted to play a nurse and Hayek said she wanted to play all five of them – something that was accomplished with motion control camera work (requiring Hayek to repeat her dance number very carefully many times during two long days in order to create the illusion of five pin-up nurses). Eddie Izzard plays the role of the circus ringleader in “Being For the Benefit of Mr. Kite!” and Joe Cocker worked in the middle of several nights to complete his multiple “Come Together” roles of singing bum, pimp, and hippie.

 

REINTERPRETING THE SONGS

In addition to having a story that was layered enough to do justice to the songs, the other key element to the film was the musical interpretation, says Taymor. “It was really scary having the legacy of the Beatles’ music on your shoulders, because it's the Holy Grail,” she says. “It’s so important to so many people, and the originals were perfect. We knew from the beginning that we did not want to compete with the Beatles’ versions,” says Taymor. She felt that the best way to honor the band was to have their songs be the heart and the star of the film, emanating right from the characters.

To interpret the music, Taymor relied upon a trusted longtime collaborator, Elliot Goldenthal. “Though Elliot is a composer and there are no songs to be composed, his arrangements and his understanding of drama and character are so great. I’ve worked with him for twenty years and have total trust and admiration for his work. I knew that he would find a new way to interpret the songs; by placing them with new arrangements, the music would be fresh again – not a better version, but different.”

Goldenthal and Taymor also brought in renowned rock music producer T Bone Burnett and producer Teese Gohl, who has worked with Goldenthal as a music producer on more than 20 films. Goldenthal, Burnett, and Gohl collaborated on producing the music.

Every song was analyzed: who would be singing, what was the content, the feeling needed from it in the film, and the time period. Goldenthal notes, “Everybody knows the Beatles' music so well, it’s almost like a ghost in the room. All the licks that they played, the specific guitar fills, the drum fills – everybody fills those in when they hear the songs. The songs were done perfectly already by the Beatles – they are definitive performances. So the challenge was try to find an honest way – staying within oneself – of getting to the core of these songs and try to find other ways to support the beautiful words and music.”

 

To give the music authenticity, the team recorded many of the songs using period appropriate equipment, such as analog tape and vintage microphones. Gohl recalls, “We were all on the same page in taking this approach and in our desire to avoid the digital pitfalls.”

As for working with the Goldenthal, Gohl says, “Elliot is unique in every sense, but to see him as a rock ‘n’ roll producer is yet another mind-blower.”

It was not enough, of course, merely to come up with new arrangements for the songs. Because the lyrics of the songs tell the story of the film, it was crucial to Taymor that the performances have immediacy and relevance to the scenes around them. With that goal in mind, the filmmakers decided to make the movie with as much live singing as possible. She gives credit to another one of her team members, sound mixer Tod Maitland, for making it work.

“He’s another genius,” says Taymor, because “most of the movie is live.”

Maitland, who is a three-time Academy Award® nominee, had most recently worked on the more traditional movie musical The Producers, but Across the Universe would require an entirely different approach. He explains why such a radical move was necessary: “In most musicals, the actor speaks and then they go into a singing voice. For most people, a singing voice is an entirely different voice – something they did in a studio two or three months earlier. It takes you out of the film. On Across the Universe, we wanted to keep the environment real. When you transition from speaking to singing, we want those moments to flow free, so that you don’t go in and out of different sound qualities – you want to stay in the scene. In addition, because the lyrics serve as dialogue in this movie, you want to hear the little bit of bounce off the walls, you want to hear people moving around. You don’t want a very closed-in, studio sound.”

The actors began the process by pre-recording their songs; these would to give them an idea of how their performance would go and provide a back-up for the editing process. In these sessions, the actors each performed the songs on three tracks: the first a studio microphone, the second a boom mike, like the one used on set, and the third a “lavalier” mike, also used on set.

 

 

 

During the shoot, the set would have to be extremely quiet to record a live vocal performance. The actors were all fitted with tiny ear pieces, called “earwigs,” to enable them to sing along with their pre-recorded performance. The pre-recorded track would give the actors a guideline to follow and allowed some freedom in the sound editing, according to Maitland. “If an actor turns his head away and goes off mike, we could pull in a vocal pre-record and lay that over. Or if there’s some noise over a take that the filmmakers really loved, we could go to a vocal pre-record.” However, he stresses, those are the exceptions. “The design of the whole film is to use live vocals as much as possible.”

The somewhat tricky process was made easier by the cinematographer, Bruno Delbonnel, and his lighting designer, John DeBlau, who consulted with the sound department when placing their lights, in order to help them to keep the boom microphone as close to the actors’ heads as possible. For the optimum result, the mike had to be only 12 to 15 inches from the actor, the same distance used in the pre-recording sessions.

 

ABOUT THE CHOREOGRAPHY

Just as the music in Across the Universe would be a radical reinvention of the well-known songs, the film also required a unique look to the choreography. The film had to be a feast for the eyes as well as the ears.

“I didn’t want this to be a ‘dance’ musical,” says Taymor. Although there is quite a bit of dance in the film, she says, “We talked a lot about using everyday movement as the vocabulary.” To bring this vision to life, Taymor called upon Daniel Ezralow a choreographer with whom she has collaborated on several other works.

“Danny straddles the theatrical modern dance world as well as pop, and circus, and acrobats, and everyday movement,” she says. “If you look at ‘With a Little Help from My Friends,’ the choreography is people sliding down banisters, it’s leaping up and falling into couches. If you look at ‘Come Together,’ you see the people in the street, walking in unison with briefcases. Some sequences are more ‘dance-y’ than others, but the pieces that feel like they’re organically coming from naturalistic movement work beautifully.”

“From the very beginning, I wanted Across the Universe to be totally naturalistic and unlike any other musical,” says Ezralow. “I said that out loud, and then I was stuck. There were witnesses!”

Ezralow’s idea was that the film would take its cues from the way we all move through the world now. “Everyone has their iPods on – they close the world,” he says. “As you do, as you look at other people, it’s like walking through a movie. It’s an altered experience. Every day, as I rode the subway on my way to the set, I would listen to the songs from Across the Universe and imagine movement.”

“Julie encourages us to see things differently,” Ezralow says. “When you’re a foreigner in a country, sometimes you get a better sense of what that country is like than someone who has lived there all his life, because you’re seeing it with fresh eyes. So it’s a little trick I play on myself – I try to be a stranger to dance all the time.”

Of course, the film does feature a couple of more traditional dance sequences. For these, Ezralow cast some of Broadway’s and the world’s finest dancers to fill more than 350 dancing roles. The casting process was often difficult because many of these dancers were appearing in shows every night. For the “induction center” sequence, set to the song “I Want You,” the dancers playing the “sergeants” had to report at 3:30 in the morning to begin complicated makeup and prosthetics – and many had been dancing on a Broadway stage until 11 PM the previous night.

“Mark Friedberg, the production designer, and Julie and I sat together and talked about the sequence early on,” Ezralow remembers. “It was a whirlwind, wonderfully improvisational day. Everyone contributed something – Julie, concept; me, dance; Mark, design. The sequence ends up being surreal and artistically playful, but also powerful and poignant.”

“Come Together” represents the other true highlight of choreography in the film. At one point, 140 people move in unison in midtown Manhattan; at another moment during the song, the filmmakers envisioned a Rube Goldberg-style device timed to the song. Ezralow says that the song is “a middle point in the film; we define what New York City in the 60s was all about.”

 

ABOUT THE PRODUCTION

Across the board, Taymor attracted an exceptional team of collaborators for Across The Universe. In the key role of cinematographer, she chose Frenchman Bruno Delbonnel, who although he has just begun shooting films in the US, is already a two-time Academy Award® nominee.

Taymor recalls: “Bruno, in our first interview said, ‘I hate musicals.’ I thought, ‘Now what do I think about that? That’s interesting.’ And I thought, he’s done Amélie and A Very Long Engagement, these incredibly theatrical movies. He has an incredible sense of light and photography. I knew that tough, European sense with him: he would want it to be a serious movie, not fluff; that the darkness would be there when I wanted it to be there, but it would also have that whimsy and theatricality that was very important.”

Mark Friedberg (Far From Heaven, The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou, The Producers) served as production designer. For Friedberg, it was a special opportunity to work with Taymor, a director who happens to be one of the most creative theater designers of our time. He notes, “Julie Taymor has dreams that are better than anything I could ever design.” Taymor came in one morning and described to him the image of Vietnamese women dancing on the water as part of the montage for the song “Across the Universe,” which she had dreamt the night before. “That is not fair,” he laughs. “I want to be able to do that.”

Friedberg says that Taymor’s greatest strengths are that “she is brave and she is committed to following her ideas to their fullest. She is not afraid that they might fail.” In fact, he says, her only fear is not going far enough. “She is afraid that our ideas might not be interesting, or that we are not trying hard enough, or we are not challenging ourselves enough. It’s an amazing and inspiring way to work.”

As a result, Friedberg says, his greatest challenge on Across the Universe was not the technical process of realizing Taymor’s vision, but living up to her expectations of creating a wholly new and original work. “She let me go and get way out there and see if I would find anything she would like, and usually the stuff that was farther out was the stuff she was curious about. I wanted to interpret the 60s in a way that was relevant and interesting. I didn’t want to re-create it – I wanted to reinvent it.”

So while Friedberg’s art department began with a tremendous amount of historic research, he also had a bit of artistic freedom to reinterpret the 60s, and pull in other influences. Friedberg and Taymor looked at a lot of graffiti art from the 80s until present day for inspiration for Jude’s art and a lot of the downtown East Village neighborhood. An example of how the production design would sometimes “reinvent” the 60s was Dr. Robert’s “magic bus.” As Dr. Robert is inspired by Neal Cassady, the real-life figure who drove Ken Kesey’s famous bus Furthur, that bus became the starting point for the design; however, Taymor thought it looked somehow old. She loved Friedberg’s “Basquiat-inspired,” cool, contemporary version. Graffiti art is not true to the period, but Taymor preferred its slightly rougher, street edge to the sweeter and more flowery, more stereotypical 60s look, and it became a useful design element.

“As a designer herself, she has a very keen visual sense,” Friedberg continues. “She has a very powerful aesthetic. She’s operatic. She’s also a collaborator. She asks ‘What do you think?’ and she is always open to the best idea in the room. We had an easy vocabulary. Julie would say, ‘For the circus, I want to use a Matisse palette,’ and I knew exactly what she was talking about.”

Perhaps not surprisingly, Friedberg was most anxious about one part of the production: the film’s large-scale puppetry. He went to an expert puppet designer, Paul Rice, a top puppet maker from the theater, who had built 15 of the Pumbaa puppets for worldwide theatrical productions of Taymor’s “The Lion King.” Rice and his crew would make small maquettes of the puppets to show Taymor and she would give them her feedback, with very specific instructions on color, shading, and movement. For the circus scenes – which take their inspiration from the radical Bread & Puppet Theater, founded in the 60s in New York City – Rice would carve a puppet for about two days before a crew of about 13 people began the process of painting and paper mâché. Two of the largest puppets they built were an 18-foot-high face at the circus and a 27-foot-tall walking man at the peace march. The giant arms and hands in the circus spanned 120 feet.

One other key design challenge would be finding a visual look and for Jude’s work. A member of the art department crew named Don Nace became the source of Jude’s artistry. Friedberg had used Nace on his crew before, but was not even aware of the scope of his work until someone in the art department suggested he check out www.drawingoftheday.com, Nace’s website. Taymor liked his work the best and so the important character of Jude’s art was cast from within the crew. Jim Sturgess, the actor who plays Jude, worked alongside Nace in a studio, in preparation for the scenes (like “Strawberry Fields”) in which Jude is working. “Don would give me little tasks to do each day… We would sit and listen to Tom Waits records and he would just sit in the corner, kind of sketching and drawing and give me little things to do.”

The induction center and the VA hospital were two of the most unique stage sets. They are “bookends of the Army experience,” says Friedberg. “We made it very olive drab, black and white. Julie wanted a mechanized experience for the induction. Even the sergeants are very robotic.” During breaks in filming, the dancers playing the sergeants broke up the menacing scene by using the conveyor belt set as a “catwalk,” with each trying to do his best runway model impression while wearing full prosthetic makeup.

The induction center is one of the moments that is a true abstraction from reality, which turns into more of a musical number. Another was “Happiness Is A Warm Gun,” which takes place in a round hospital room (and features a cameo by choreographer Daniel Ezralow as a possessed dancing priest).

“I thought it was cruel to make the guys all look at each other,” says Friedberg. “So we made the room round. This was also a historic reference to old tuberculosis wards; when they were built in Victorian times, scientists believed that germs lived in corners. So if you had a round room you had no corners – you had no germs. On top of that, we had the idea that maybe the room would spin – the song would be stronger than gravity. It was one of the first discussions that Julie and I had.”

Another key member of the production team was legendary costume designer Albert Wolsky (an Academy Award® winner for Bugsy and All That Jazz, and an Oscar® nominee for three more films).

Wolsky explains that his greatest challenge was dressing the nearly 5,000 extras in the film. “Anybody who has a non-speaking part, every single one, all have to be dressed from head to toe. We did mass fittings five days a week with teams of fitters,” he says.

But even while dressing the masses, every detail is crucial, says Wolsky: “Without the right hair and makeup, the clothes won’t make any difference. You have to find ways to capture the period without making it too costume-y. I wasn’t out to make a costume ball. I wanted to make it like real clothes, but also to have this feeling of some other time.”

He continues: “What makes it interesting for me is that the beginnings are all very specific. Jude comes from Liverpool, so that’s one look. Jo-Jo comes from Detroit, that’s another look. Max and Lucy come from the Massachusetts area, that’s another look. And they all converge onto New York and the Village.”

* * *

Most of Across the Universe was shot on practical locations – over 50 locations in 60 days, mostly in the New York City area. Coordinating this complicated shoot was First Assistant Director Geoff Hansen, who says, “Julie is one of the most creative, artistic directors I’ve ever worked with in my life. She’s got a vision that blows me away. She’ll have this image, say, of Vietnamese ladies floating in a lake with masks next to them, and I’m the guy who has to figure out how to get the crew up there and shoot it and where we’re going to eat lunch and everything else involved with executing that idea.”

Location manager Rob Striem notes: “On a lot of films you have a few locations where you can settle in and get comfortable. On this film, every single set was one, two or three days at most, so we were constantly jumping around.”

Many of the sets that would be shot for only a couple of days required two-to-four weeks of preparation. Every day that the crew was shooting on one set, they could be simultaneously prepping four other sets and striking two that were completed – all over New York City. And this work was not simple work, like painting walls and dressing a living room, says Striem, but “making the South Bronx into Detroit, dealing with 50 active businesses.”

Indeed, the film company created so many different worlds – Detroit, Vietnam, Washington D.C., suburban Massachusetts, Muscoot farm, where they staged the circus, and other “magical” environments – all within the New York City area.

Rivington Street on the Lower East Side of Manhattan was one of the biggest locations for the film. The hip and artsy neighborhood was transformed into a heightened version of the East Village scene in the 1960s. A few real businesses from St. Mark’s Place that actually existed were portrayed, but the art department mixed it up and made the area more colorful and exaggerated than anything that was really in New York at the time. Much of the Rivington Street set was actually inspired by the Haight Ashbury district in San Francisco, says Friedberg. “There’s probably not too much in that location that did not exist somewhere, but it did not exist all together. We made an impressionistic collage of the world of youthful self-expression.”

The set stretched for three blocks; from Attorney Street to Norfolk Street on Rivington, then a half block North and South on Clinton Street. The Rivington/Clinton intersection was the major crossroads, where the dancers would do their “Come Together” number and several other scenes were staged.

The neighborhood was extremely supportive of this psychedelic explosion. The local newspapers encouraged people to drive by and check out the sets while they were still up, and after filming was completed, several neighborhood restaurants chose to leave up the colorful paint and murals.

A similar thing happened on lower Fifth Avenue, near Washington Square Park, where a peace march set to the song “Dear Prudence” was filmed. Area residents wanted to leave up the peace symbols and anti-war banners. It was another moment where the 60s and the present seemed to come together, so to speak. Similarly, the art department found that they did not have to create mock newspaper stories for set dressing: they took current newspaper articles about Iraq and changed the names in the headlines, and found they worked perfectly for Vietnam stories.

As for the actual Vietnam scenes, the production staged them in one day in Moonachie, New Jersey, in a swampy area out near the Meadowlands Arena. The production also went to New Jersey to shoot “A Little Help from My Friends” at Princeton. In these scenes, Joe Anderson got the chance to perform a little stunt work, firing a gun in the Vietnam sequence and sliding down a 35-foot-high marble staircase at Princeton.

The South Bronx became the Detroit riots, again a massive undertaking for a shoot that was only one day. The production picked a block that New York City has plans to raze, so the challenge was to make one side of the street that was entirely abandoned look occupied. The Detroit scenes required 20-25 stunt people, explosions, and stunt guys on rooftops firing guns. For Jo-Jo’s little brother’s funeral, Taymor wanted a cemetery that was adjacent to a church but entirely surrounded by concrete in an urban setting. The production laid sod in a parking lot and created the cemetery, since nothing like that existed.

Washington D.C. was also staged in uptown Manhattan, at Grant’s Tomb, and the Columbia University student riots worked out well at the Museum of the City of New York.

During filming, Wood and Sturgess coined a phrase to describe the sometimes overwhelming nature of the project. “Jim and I had this joke – we’d call it an Across the Universe moment, when we would stop and we really think about what we’re doing,” says Wood. “It would make us cry.”

Wood had that experience early in the shoot, doing “Let It Be,” the funeral scene for her high school boyfriend. They had already shot the scene where the soldiers come to the door and tell them Daniel has died; “I thought I’d gotten it all out then,” says Wood. When they came to the day of the funeral, “I knew it was a hard scene for Lucy,” she continues, “but I wasn’t really going to break down or cry or anything. And then they said ‘action’ and they started playing ‘Let It Be’ and they started folding the American flag in front of me, and I don’t know what happened, but I just completely broke down; I just couldn’t contain it. Listening to the song, I thought, ‘This is probably going on right now; people are still seeing this every day, and people still have to fold these American flags in front of these families.’ It just killed me. This movie has just had a really big effect on me in that way.”

 

ABOUT THE CAST

An actress who has both an ability to access a depth of emotions and demonstrate a poise well beyond her years, Evan Rachel Wood (Lucy) is one of Hollywood's brightest young talents.

Wood was nominated for a Golden Globe Award, a SAG Award and a Critic's Choice Award in 2004 for her role in the critically acclaimed drama Thirteen, written and directed by Catherine Hardwicke. Wood starred opposite Holly Hunter as a teenager attempting to navigate her way through the harsh pressures brought upon by her peers and the family strife.

She was last seen in Ryan Murphy's drama Running with Scissors. Written and directed by Murphy ("Nip/Tuck") and starring Wood alongside Annette Bening, Gwyneth Paltrow and Alec Baldwin, the film follows the memories of a man's colorful childhood with his bipolar and self-centered mother. She was also recently seen in David Jacobson's Down in the Valley opposite Edward Norton, David Morse and Rory Culkin. Set in the present-day San Fernando Valley, the film revolves around a delusional man (Norton) who believes he's a cowboy and the relationship that he starts with Wood's rebellious young woman.

Wood will next be seen in Vadim Perelman's In Bloom opposite Uma Thurman and in Michael Cahill's comedy King of California opposite Michael Douglas. King of California premiered at the 2007 Sundance Film Festival to rave reviews. Wood will soon begin production on Charles Sturridge's Bronte opposite Bryce Dallas Howard.

Other film credits include Mike Binder's The Upside of Anger, opposite Joan Allen and Kevin Costner; Marcos Siega's Pretty Persuasion, opposite Ron Livingston and James Woods; Ron Howard's western adventure The Missing, opposite Tommy Lee Jones and Cate Blanchett; the Andrew Niccol's comedy Simone, opposite Al Pacino; Little Secrets, with Vivica A. Fox; Practical Magic with Nicole Kidman and Sandra Bullock; Timothy Hutton's Digging to China; and Detour, with Michael Madsen.

On television, Wood starred in ABC's critically acclaimed hit drama series, "Once and Again." Created by Marshall Herskovitz and Ed Zwick, the series followed the efforts of divorcees (played by Sela Ward and Billy Campbell) trying to sustain a new relationship through the countless hurdles presented by their children, their ex-spouses and everyday life. Wood gained notice as Campbell's character's sensitive daughter 'Jessie' who had difficulty dealing with the pains of divorce and adolescence. She recently appeared as the niece of Allison Janney's character on NBC's critically acclaimed drama "The West Wing."

Wood's stage credits include "The Miracle Worker" for Theatre in the Park, "A Midsummer Night's Dream" for Shakespeare in the Park and a three-year tour with "A Christmas Carol."

Among her talents, Wood is a black belt in Tae Kwon Do and is also trained in singing and dance. She lives in Los Angeles.

 

Jim Sturgess (Jude), who makes his debut in a leading role in Across the Universe, has quickly become one of Hollywood’s most sought-after leading men.

In February, Sturgess will star in The Other Boleyn Girl for director Justin Chadwick opposite Scarlett Johansson, Natalie Portman, and Eric Bana. The film follows two ferociously ambitious sisters, Mary and Anne Boleyn, rivaling for the bed and heart of King Henry VIII. Sturgess plays George Boleyn, Mary and Anne's brother.

In March, Sturgess will star in director Robert Luketic's 21, starring opposite Kate Bosworth, Kevin Spacey, and Laurence Fishburne. 21 is loosely inspired by five MIT students who were trained to become experts in card counting and subsequently took Vegas casinos for millions in winnings.

Sturgess most recently completed production on director Wayne Kramer's Crossing Over, starring opposite Harrison Ford, Ashley Judd and Sean Penn. Crossing Over is a multi-character drama about immigrants of different nationalities struggling to achieve legal status in Los Angeles. The film addresses the issue from the point of view of the immigrants, as well as the immigration authorities tasked with enforcing the nation’s immigration laws. Crossing Over will be released by The Weinstein Company.

Sturgess resides in London, England.

 

JOE ANDERSON (Max) currently stars in the Miramax feature Becoming Jane, and next stars opposite Samantha Morton in Control, a biopic about the UK band Joy Division, and in DreamWorks’ The Ruins. Anderson’s first screen role was opposite Ed Harris in Agnieszka Holland’s Copying Beethoven.

Anderson’s theatrical work includes “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” and “Master and Margherita,” both at the Chichester Festival Theatre.

He has appeared in several productions for British television, including “Afterlife” for ITV, “A Doll’s House” for BBC, and “Cause Celebre,” “Vacation with Trunks,” and “Midsomer Murders.”

 

Dana Fuchs (Sadie) makes her film debut in Across the Universe. On stage in New York City, Fuchs starred in the Off-Broadway hit "Love, Janis," about the life of Janis Joplin.

The youngest of six musical children, Dana Fuchs was raised in a small town in rural Florida surrounded by music. Arriving in NYC alone and broke at the age of 19, Fuchs joined with guitarist Jon Diamond to form the Dana Fuchs Band. Within a year, the band was a feature act at New York's best blues clubs, often sharing the stage with the likes of John Popper, James Cotton, and Taj Mahal. She began writing her own rock songs and became a staple on the rock scene sharing the bill with national acts Little Feat, Marianne Faithfull, and Etta James. Through these performances, she was spotted by the producers of "Love, Janis," who cast her after hearing a single performance of "Piece of My Heart." Her songs (which she writes as well as performs) have been featured in the film Sherrybaby.

Fuchs' songs can be heard on the upcoming "Dana Fuchs Live From NYC" CD and DVD, as well as on her debut CD, "Lonely For A Lifetime," which was released to an enthusiastic response from both press and fans. Her website is www.danafuchs.com.

 

MARTIN LUTHER McCOY (Jo-Jo) a guitarist, singer and songwriter, makes his acting debut with the role of Jo-Jo.

Recording under the name Martin Luther, he will release his next album, “Serial Thriller,” early in 2008. In the meantime, he is releasing “Live from Arlene’s Grocery” this fall exclusively on iTunes.

Luther’s most recent album, “Rebel Soul Music,” was released in September 2004 to much critical acclaim. The Associated Press named it number 4 on its Top Ten Albums of 2004 and People Magazine named it a “Critic’s Choice,” rating the album 3.5 out of 4 stars. He was the first independent artist given the privilege of recording a performance session for “MTV Live” on MTV.com. He was also named the VH1.com “You Oughta Know” artist on 2 separate occasions. His music video for the single “Daily Bread” debuted on the VH1 Soul network and was in their top-10 rotation for four months. “Rebel Soul Music” sold over 20,000 copies in the US, spurring releases of the album in Europe and Japan.

Luther has performed over 100 shows since the album’s release, traveling with his band throughout the US, Europe and Japan. He has toured as a solo artist on the same bill as Jill Scott and The Roots and has also performed for audiences numbering in the thousands as a featured member of the Roots.

Like the legend for whom he was named, Martin Luther was raised on a diet of choir hymns and stringent rules set forth by strict, religious parents. As a youngster, he was forced to take traditional piano lessons so that he could one day play in church. Exposure to the psychedelic sounds of Parliament Funkadelic by his brother set him on the path to finding his own voice as an artist. Continuing to play the keyboard, he added the drums to his musical arsenal and finally mastered his secret weapon – the guitar.

Luther’s independently released debut album, The Calling, sparked the interest of worldwide fans and critics alike for its uplifting lyrics and fresh mix of rock and soul.

His rendition of “This Christmas” was recently featured on Target’s 2005 Christmas album. He also wrote a special song for O, The Oprah Magazine, which was featured on “The Oprah Winfrey Show.” He has appeared on “The Chris Rock Show” and performed alongside George Clinton & Parliament Funkadelic, Jill Scott, Eric Benet, and Cody Chestnutt, to name a few. He also gave an unforgettable performance with Dave Matthews at the NAACP Image Awards.

A native of San Francisco, Martin Luther is a graduate of Morehouse College, with a degree in Media Arts and a concentration in Entertainment Law and Marketing.

 

T.V. CARPIO (Prudence) was born in Oklahoma City but grew up in Hong Kong with her mother, Teresa Carpio, who was, and still is, a household name as a singer and entertainer in Asia. By junior high, her family had moved back to the States, where T.V.’s promising ice-skating career was curtailed by injury. Upon graduation from high school, she took time out to become fluent in Spanish before enrolling herself into the jazz program at the New School University in New York City.

Carpio appeared as a dancer in music videos for Bruce Springsteen and Whitney Houston, among others, which led to small parts on the television series “Law & Order” and “The Jury.” As an alto soprano, she sang with the Hong Kong Philharmonic in her mother's acclaimed Diva concerts, playing and singing the part of her mother as an 18-year-old.

From there, Carpio landed the role of Gail in Spike Lee’s She Hate Me, followed by the role of Angela in Lee's Sucker Free City for Showtime.

She now lives in New York City and just finished a stint in “Rent” on Broadway.

 

ABOUT THE FILMMAKERS

Theater, film and opera director JULIE TAYMOR’s (Director, Story by) most recent film is Frida, starring Salma Hayek and Alfred Molina. The film garnered six Oscar® nominations, winning two. Taymor made her feature film directorial debut in 1999 with Titus, starring Anthony Hopkins and Jessica Lange.  Based on Shakespeare's play, “Titus Andronicus,” her adapted screenplay is published in an illustrated book by Newmarket Press.

Taymor has received numerous awards for “The Lion King,” which opened at the New Amsterdam Theater in 1997, including two Tony Awards: for best direction of a musical and for her original costume designs.  She also co-designed the masks and puppets and wrote additional lyrics for “The Lion King,” which has been performed in eleven countries around the world. “The Lion King” most recently premiered in South Africa and opens in Paris in October 2007.

Her direction of the opera “The Magic Flute” opened in the fall of 2004, with James Levine conducting, and is now in repertory at The Metropolitan Opera. 

Taymor directed Carlo Gozzi's “The Green Bird” on Broadway in 2000.  It was first produced in 1996 by Theatre For a New Audience at The New Victory Theater and presented at the La Jolla Playhouse.

Taymor's original visual music-theater work, “Juan Darién: A Carnival Mass,” presented at Lincoln Center's Vivian Beaumont Theater in 1996, received five Tony nominations including best director.  Originally produced by Music Theater Group in 1988, “Juan Darién” was directed and designed by Taymor, and co-written with the composer Elliot Goldenthal. The recipient of two Obies and numerous other awards, it was also performed at The Edinburgh International Festival, festivals in France, Jerusalem and Montreal, and had an extended run in San Francisco.

In September 1995, Taymor directed Wagner's “The Flying Dutchman” for the Los Angeles Music Center in a co-production with the Houston Grand Opera.  She directed Strauss' “Salome” for the Kirov Opera in Russia, Germany, and Israel, under the baton of Valery Gergiev. In June 1993, she directed Mozart's “The Magic Flute” for the Maggio Musicale in Florence, Zubin Mehta conducting. 

Taymor's first opera direction was of Stravinsky's “Oedipus Rex” for the Saito Kinen Orchestra in Japan, under the baton of Seiji Ozawa in 1992.  The opera featured Philip Langridge as Oedipus and Jessye Norman as Jocasta.  Her film of the opera premiered at the Sundance Film Festival and won the Jury Award at the Montreal Festival of Films on Art.  The film was broadcast internationally in 1993, garnering an Emmy Award and the 1994 International Classical Music Award for best opera production.

Fool’s Fire, Taymor's first film, which she both adapted and directed, is based on Edgar Allan Poe's short story, “Hop-Frog.” Produced by American Playhouse, it premiered at the Sundance Film Festival and aired on PBS in March 1992.  The film won the "Best Drama" award at the Tokyo International Electronic Cinema Festival.

Taymor's stage production of Shakespeare's “Titus Andronicus” was produced off-Broadway by Theatre For a New Audience in 1994. Other directing credits include “The Tempest” (TFANA at the Stratford American Shakespeare Festival), “The Taming of the Shrew,” “The Transposed Heads” (based on the novella by Thomas Mann, co-produced by the American Musical Theater Festival and The Lincoln Center), and “Liberty’s Taken,” an original musical co-created with David Suehsdorf and Elliot Goldenthal.

While on a Watson Fellowship in Indonesia from 1975-79, Taymor developed a mask/dance company, Teatr Loh, consisting of Javanese, Balinese, Sundanese, French, German and American actors, musicians, dancers and puppeteers.  The company toured throughout Indonesia with two original productions, “Way of Snow” and “Tirai” (subsequently performed in the USA).

In 1991 Taymor received a MacArthur “genius” Fellowship.  She has also received a Guggenheim Fellowship, two OBIE Awards, the first Annual Dorothy B. Chandler Award in Theater, and the 1990 Brandeis Creative Arts Award.  An illustrated book on her career, Julie Taymor: Playing with Fire, was recently expanded and revised by Harry N. Abrams.  Her book, The Lion King: Pride Rock on Broadway, is published by Hyperion.  An illustrated book, Frida: Bringing Frida Kahlo's Life and Art to Film, is available from Newmarket Press. A major retrospective of 25 years of Taymor's work opened in the fall of 1999 at the Wexner Center for the Arts in Ohio and toured the National Museum of Women in the Arts (Washington D.C.) and the Field Museum (Chicago).

Taymor recently collaborated with Goldenthal on an original opera, “Grendel,” which premiered at the Los Angeles Opera in 2006 and subsequently at the Lincoln Center Festival. 

 

SUZANNE & JENNIFER TODD (Producers) co-founded their production company Team Todd in 1997. They are currently based at Sony Pictures Entertainment, partnered in a production deal with producer Joe Roth. Together, they have produced over a dozen movies for both film and television, garnering both critical and commercial success. Their productions include the highly acclaimed films Memento and Boiler Room, as well as all three of the Austin Powers films, which together grossed over half a billion dollars worldwide.

Suzanne and Jennifer won the Independent Spirit Award for best feature for Memento, which also won Christopher Nolan best screenwriter and director awards. The film was also nominated for the AFI Movie of the year, and was nominated for both an Oscar® and a Golden Globe for its screenplay. For their HBO film “If These Walls Could Talk 2” the Todds garnered an Emmy nomination for Outstanding Made for Television Movie, as well as a nomination for the Television Producer of the Year Award in Longform by the Producers Guild of America.

Suzanne and Jennifer were also awarded the prestigious Lucy Award from Women in Film, an award given to women who have helped expand the role of women in the entertainment industry.

The Todds’ credits include Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery, Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me, and Austin Powers in Goldmember, all starring Mike Myers and directed by Jay Roach. The three highly successful films make up one of the most successful comedy franchises in film history. They also produced Boiler Room, the gritty Wall Street drama starring Giovanni Ribisi and Ben Affleck, which was nominated for Best Feature and Best First Screenplay at the Independent Spirit Awards, as well as the two very successful romantic comedies: Must Love Dogs, starring John Cusack and Diane Lane, and Prime, starring Meryl Streep and Uma Thurman.

In addition to Across the Universe, Team Todd also has the film Ira and Abby opening September 14th, 2007. The slightly subversive romantic comedy was directed by Robert Cary and stars Chris Messina and Jennifer Westfeldt, with the screenplay written by Westfeldt. It has already won best feature at the HBO Comedy Arts Festival earlier this year and is being released by Magnolia Pictures.

Next up, the Todds are in post-production on The Accidental Husband, starring Uma Thurman, Colin Firth, and Jeffrey Dean Morgan. The film is about a radio talk show host who on the eve of her wedding discovers a clerical error and learns she’s already married to another man. It was directed by Griffin Dunne, and it will be released in early 2008 by the Yari Film Group.

 

Oscar® nominee Matthew Gross (Producer) is president of the film and television production company, Gross Entertainment.

Since 2003, Gross Entertainment has had an exclusive 5-year television production deal with ABC Television Studios. Gross was executive producer of last year’s critically acclaimed and award winning action series “Day Break.” He is currently in production on the new ABC television series “Dirty Sexy Money” starring Peter Krause, Donald Sutherland, and Billy Baldwin. Gross is also currently in pre-production on Fired Up!, a youth comedy he is producing for Screen Gems with MAXIM magazine and Dennis Publishing.

Gross is the former president of production for Kopelson Entertainment where he produced Joe Somebody starring Tim Allen. During Gross’ tenure at Kopelson, the company produced Devil’s Advocate, A Perfect Murder, U.S. Marshals, Mad City, Murder at 1600, Don’t Say a Word, and Twisted. Gross’ responsibilities included the supervision and development of all motion pictures, as well as managing and administrating a staff of 25 employees.

In addition, Gross was president of Kopelson Telemedia, a company he was instrumental in creating. Kopelson Telemedia executive produced the series “The Fugitive” starring Tim Daly for CBS and “Thieves” starring John Stamos for ABC.

Prior to working at Kopelson Entertainment, Matthew was vice president of development for Wilshire Court Productions, a division of the Paramount Television Group where he oversaw the development and production of 65 films.

Gross began his entertainment career as an actor while attending UCLA as an Economics major, but soon realized his desires lay primarily in filmmaking. Working his way from production assistant and assistant production coordinator, Gross then attended the American Film Institute, where he received a Masters Degree in filmmaking. At AFI, he produced five short films and directed a documentary for Cedars Sinai Medical Center. As a young producer, Gross was nominated for an Academy Award® in the Best Live Action Short Film category for his film Bronx Cheers.

Gross was born and raised in Los Angeles, where he continues to reside with his wife and three children.

 

DEREK DAUCHY (Executive Producer), part of the creative team at Revolution Studios, has helped develop and oversee feature films including Are We Done Yet?, The Benchwarmers, XXX franchise, Anger Management, Daddy Day Care, Radio, The Animal, and Darkness Falls (which he also executive produced). He recently oversaw and executive produced The Fog, XXX: State of the Union, Are We There Yet?, and Man of the House. Dauchy previously spent three years working for Barry Levinson and Paula Weinstein at their Baltimore/Spring Creek Pictures, where he helped develop such blockbusters as The Perfect Storm and Analyze This.

 

RUDD SIMMONS (Executive Producer) previously served as executive producer of The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou, The Royal Tenenbaums, and The Hi-Lo Country. He also produced the feature films Dead Man Walking and High Fidelity, as well as a segment of Jim Jarmusch’s Coffee and Cigarettes. A longtime collaborator of Jarmusch’s, Simmons’ credits include Night on Earth, Mystery Train, and Down by Law.

 

CHARLES NEWIRTH (Executive Producer) joined Revolution Studios in May 2000, and is responsible for the physical production of all of Revolution Studios’ motion pictures. Now in its seventh year of operation, Revolution Studios has released 40 films, including America’s Sweethearts, Black Hawk Down, xXx, Anger Management, Daddy Day Care, Hellboy, 13 Going On 30, Click, Are We There Yet? and Rocky Balboa. At Revolution Studios, Newirth served as executive producer on Maid in Manhattan, The One, America’s Sweethearts, Christmas with the Kranks, Freedomland, and Perfect Stranger.

Prior to joining Revolution Studios, Newirth produced 1999’s sleeper hit Galaxy Quest. He also produced the popular Robin Williams hit Patch Adams and Home Fries starring Drew Barrymore.

Newirth’s other credits as an executive producer include Brad Silberling’s City of Angels starring Nicolas Cage and Meg Ryan; Rob Reiner’s true-life drama Ghosts of Mississippi with Alec Baldwin, Whoopi Goldberg, and James Woods; The American President, also for director Rob Reiner, starring Michael Douglas and Annette Bening; and Jon Turteltaub’s Phenomenon starring John Travolta. In addition, Newirth co-produced Robert Zemeckis’ Academy Award®-winning blockbuster Forrest Gump. He also served as a co-producer on the Barry Levinson films Toys and Bugsy, and as an associate producer on Levinson’s Avalon.

A native New Yorker, Newirth broke into the film industry as a location manager on such films as Flashdance, Pretty in Pink, and Ferris Bueller’s Day Off. He later moved up to production manager on Throw Momma From the Train and RoboCop before getting his first producing credit as an associate producer on Andrew Davis’ The Package.

 

Bruno Delbonnel, A.F.C. (Director of Photography) received an Academy Award® nomination, the ASC award, and the Cesar Award for best cinematography for his work on the 2004 film A Very Long Engagement.

For his previous collaboration with director Jean-Pierre Jeunet, Amélie, he received an Academy Award® nomination, BAFTA nomination, ASC nomination and the European Film Award for Best Cinematographer.

He is slated to re-team with Jeunet on the upcoming adaptation of the award-winning bestselling novel Life of Pi. He is also set to photograph Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince for director David Yates.

Delbonnel recently photographed Infamous, about the life of Truman Capote, directed by Douglas McGrath. He photographed The Cat’s Meow for director Peter Bogdanovich, released in 2001.

His French film credits include Ni Pour, Ni Contre, Marie, Nonna, La Vierge et Moi, C’est Jamais Loin and Tout Le Monde N’a Pas Eu La Chance D’Avoir Des Parents Communistes. Delbonnel has also shot many commercials, including a spot for PBS (“Bucket Brigade”) for which he was nominated for the 2005 AICP Award for Best Cinematography.

 

Originally a student of fine art, Manhattan native MARK FRIEDBERG (Production Designer) married his passions for both film and painting by cutting his teeth as Production Designer on a series of influential low-budget movies that came about during the New York indie film movement of the early-90’s.

Friedberg’s previous work on small but noteworthy endeavors such as Alexandre Rockwell’s In the Soup and Maggie Greenwald’s The Ballad of Little Jo earned great attention leading to his collaboration with a variety of filmmakers ranging from industry stalwarts Garry Marshall (Runaway Bride) and Mel Brooks (The Producers, 2005) to independent mavericks like Mira Nair (Kama Sutra: A Tale of Love), Ang Lee (The Ice Storm), Ed Harris (Pollock), Todd Haynes (Far from Heaven), and Jim Jarmusch (Broken Flowers).

Other projects completed but not yet released include Charlie Kaufman’s Synecdoche, New York, which just completed principal photography, and The Darjeeling Limited, about three brothers’ train ride across the Indian sub-continent for director Wes Anderson (with whom Friedberg had previously worked on The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou).

 

This is FranÇoise Bonnot, A.C.E.’s (Editor) third collaboration with director Julie Taymor: she also edited Frida and Titus.

For Bonnot, cinema runs in the family. When she was born, her mother, Monique Bonnot, was a well-known film editor working with the legendary Jean-Pierre Melville. Once grown-up, Bonnot also became an editor and her brother Alain became a film director. Francoise Bonnot married famous French film director Henri Verneuil and their son, Patrick Malakian, carried on the family tradition by also becoming a film director.

Bonnot became Costa Gavras’s longtime collaborator and received an Academy Award® for Best Film Editing in 1969 for Z and the British Academy Award for Missing in 1982. She re-edited Jean-Jacques Annaud’s Black and White in Color, which won the Best Foreign Film Academy Award® in 1976. She was nominated for the Eddie award in 1994 for John Frankenheimer’s The Burning Season, and has been nominated several times for the French Best Editing Cesar Award (Michel Drach’s Le Passé Simple, Costa Gavras’s Hanna K., and Nicole Garcia’s Place Vendôme).

During her career, she worked with other great directors, including Roman Polanski on The Tenant which was awarded the Cannes Festival Golden Palm in 1976, Volker Schlondorf (Swann in Love), Jean-Pierre Melville (L’Armée des Ombres), Michael Cimino (Year of the Dragon, The Sicilian) and Roland Joffe (Fat Man and Little Boy).

 

ALBERT WOLSKY’s (Costume Designer) work was most recently seen in Robert Towne’s Ask the Dust, starring Colin Farrell and Salma Hayek. His designs will next be seen in Charlie Wilson’s War.

A two-time Academy Award® winner for his designs on Bob Fosse’s All that Jazz and Barry Levinson’s Bugsy, Wolsky has also been nominated for Oscars® on Levinson’s Toys, the family adventure The Journey of Natty Gann, and Alan Pakula’s drama Sophie’s Choice.

Wolsky was born in Paris, France, in 1930. He graduated from City College of New York and began to work in the travel industry before leaving to pursue his life’s work in costume design at age 30. He worked as an assistant to costume design legend Helene Pons on the original Broadway production of “Camelot.”

Wolsky earned his first film credit as costume designer on The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter. In 1999, he was honored with the Costume Designers Guild Lifetime Achievement Award.

Among the more recent films for which he has designed costumes are Sam Mendes’ Road to Perdition, for which the Costume Designers Guild honored him with an Excellence for Costume Design nomination, the Jennifer Lopez comedy Maid in Manhattan, and the sci-fi comedy Galaxy Quest, which earned him a Saturn Award nomination. Other movies on which Wolsky has been costume designer include Runaway Bride, You’ve Got Mail, The Jackal, Red Corner, Striptease, Up Close & Personal, The Pelican Brief, Fatal Instinct, Enemies: A Love Story, Cookie, Crimes of the Heart, Legal Eagles, Down and Out in Beverly Hills, The Falcon and the Snowman, Moscow on the Hudson, To Be or Not to Be, Star 80, Tempest, The Jazz Singer, Manhattan, Grease, An Unmarried Woman, The Turning Point, Lenny, The Gambler, Harry and Tonto, Up the Sandbox, The Trial of the Cantonsville Nine, Little Murders, Lovers and Other Strangers, Where’s Poppa? and Popi. For television, Wolsky created costumes for the 1976 NBC special “Beauty and the Beast,” starring George C. Scott and Trish Van Devere, which earned him an Emmy Award.

 

Composer Elliot Goldenthal creates works for orchestra, theatre, opera, ballet and film. In 2003, he was honored with the Academy Award® and a Golden Globe for Best Original Score for Frida, directed by Julie Taymor.  A double Oscar® nominee that year, Goldenthal also received an Oscar® nomination for Best Original Song (“Burn it Blue,” performed by Caetano Veloso). The score was released on the Decca/UMG Label and was on Billboard’s World Music Chart and Latin charts for over 40 weeks.

In 2006, Goldenthal’s original 3-act opera Grendel, directed by Julie Taymor, premiered at the Los Angeles Opera, becoming one of the most successful productions in their history.  It had its east coast debut as the centerpiece of the Lincoln Center Festival in New York, and was added to the Los Angeles Opera’s permanent repertoire. Goldenthal was one of the two finalists for the 2006 Pulitzer Prize in music for his work on this opera.

Goldenthal's large-scale symphonic piece, Fire Water Paper, a commemorative tribute created for the 20th anniversary of the Vietnam War, commissioned by the Pacific Symphony Orchestra, was released in April of 1996 on Sony Classical Records featuring soloist Yo Yo Ma. It debuted at the Pacific Symphony Orchestra and was later performed in critically acclaimed performances at Carnegie Hall and at The Kennedy Center, with Seiji Ozawa conducting the Boston Symphony Orchestra.

Goldenthal was commissioned by the American Ballet Theater to create a new 3-act ballet of Othello, which debuted at the Metropolitan Opera in May of 1997. Othello was co-produced by the ABT in partnership with the San Francisco Ballet and was choreographed by the world-renowned Lar Lubovitch. In June of 2003, PBS’s prestigious arts series “Great Performances” broadcast a two-hour special of Othello filmed with the San Francisco Ballet and Goldenthal’s original score was nominated for an Emmy. This year, ABT performed Othello at The Metropolitan Opera House, The Dorothy Chandler Pavilion and The Kennedy Center.

He has composed music for more than a dozen theatrical productions including Juan Darién: A Carnival Mass, directed by Taymor and first produced in 1988. Juan Darién opened the season at the Vivian Beaumont Theater at Lincoln Center in 1996, winning rave reviews, as well as four Drama Desk and five Tony nominations, including Best Musical and Best Original Score.

Goldenthal composed the scores for Heat, Titus, Interview with the Vampire, Michael Collins, Batman Forever, A Time to Kill, Drugstore Cowboy, Alien 3 and many other films. He was nominated for two Golden Globe Awards, two Tony Awards, and three Chicago Film Critics Awards. He received the L.A. Film Critics Award for Best Original Score for his work on Neil Jordan’s The Butcher Boy.

 

DANIEL EZRALOW’s (choreographer) latest work can be seen in Cirque du Soleil's current hit show “Love” as well as in Ezralow's own touring Dance Theatre show “Why,” which premiered to glowing reviews in Milano, Italy, in spring, 2007. Ezralow's show “Aeros,” created with the Romanian Olympic Gymnastic Team, continues its successful tour worldwide, while his fifth new work with the renowned Hubbard Street Dance Chicago premiered at Symphony Hall Chicago with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra.

Ezralow began his career as a dancer with 5X2 Plus, Lar Lubovitch, Paul Taylor and Pilobolus. He was one of the original dancer-choreographers to create MOMIX and is a founding member of ISO Dance. He has also created original work for numerous pre-eminent dance companies through the world, including the Paris Opera Ballet, Hubbard Street Dance Chicago, London Contemporary Dance Company, and Batsheva, to name a few. His work with ISO Dance and his multi-media one man show “Mandala” have both toured worldwide to sold out audiences receiving standing ovations and glowing reviews.

Working extensively in film and television, Ezralow has choreographed for such directors as Julie Taymor, Ron Howard, Lina Wertmuller, Marco Belocchio, Nakano Hiroyuki, Dominique Sena, and Julian Temple. He has created the award winning dance special “Windows,” shown extensively on Bravo, and received an Emmy Award for his work on the PBS special “Episodes.”

In the theater, he has choreographed Julie Taymor's Broadway production of “The Green Bird” and her “Flying Dutchman" for the Los Angeles and Houston Operas. He has choreographed and associate directed a new contemporary music theatre production of “Tosca: Amore Disperato,” which premiered and performed extensively in Italy, including the Arena di Verona. He has also choreographed Maggio Musicale's production of "Aida" with Zubin Mehta conducting, directed and choreographed "The Adventures of Emilio Salgari" at the Filharmonic di Verona, and he created the choreography, stage movement and appeared with Vittorio Gassman in an adaptation of Melville's' "Moby Dick" at Theatre Champs Elysees.

In the music world, he has created choreography and staged shows for such artists as Josh Groban, Faith Hill, Andrea Bocelli, U2, David Bowie, Sting, Pat Metheny, Lucio Dalla, Ricky Martin, and many more.

Ezralow is also the recipient of The American Choreography Award's Innovator's award, an American Choreography Award for Outstanding Choreography in a Television Special, an Emmy nomination for the 1998 Academy Awards®, a Positano Award for Excellence in Choreography, and a Nijinsky Award, not to mention numerous other award nominations for his outstanding choreography in special events, live performance, opera, rock videos, commercials, film, and television programs around the world. He has also been a recipient of an NEA Fellowship Grant.

Ezralow's choreographic vision and performance participation have also been seen in innovative advertising campaigns for Gap Clothing, Danone Yogurt, New York Times Men's Fashion, Issey Miyake, Ermengilda Zegna, Hugo Boss, Xerox-Fuji, Ilford Film, Eveready Battery, Sapporo Beer, and Raymond-Weil Watches.

His image and movement grace the covers of and are featured throughout the best selling dance photography books The Fugitive Gesture and Breaking Bounds. He is the subject a feature documentary film entitled The Journey of a Dancer: Daniel Ezralow, which explores in depth Ezralow's creative process, his life and his work.

 

Born and raised in a house dedicated to classical music in Winterthur, Switzerland, Matthias “Teese” Gohl (Songs Producer, Supervising Music Producer) studied jazz composition at Berklee College in Boston, MA. After years of composing for and touring with local Jazz groups he turned to Theater Music and Sound Design. He has worked at the American Repertory Theater in Cambridge, MA, New York University, Trinity Repertory Theater in Providence, R.I., and Theater For A New Audience in NY. His theatre collaborators include Elliot Goldenthal, Anne Bogart, Oscar Eustis, Bill Alexander, Tina Landau, Brian Jucha and Andre Serban.

While in Cambridge he collaborated with Elliot Goldenthal on his score for Pet Semetary and has since produced most of his twenty film scores, including Interview with the Vampire, Michael Collins, two Batman features, Titus, and the Oscar® winning score for Julie Taymor’s Frida. Highlights of other film scores he has produced include John Corigliano's Oscar® winning score for The Red Violin and Barrington Phelong’s score for Hillary & Jackie.

As a composer for documentary films, he has worked with Ken Burns and PBS on "The West", "Frank Lloyd Wright" and "Jazz", Roger Sherman's "Alexander Calder" and "The Sweetest Sound", and Stephen Ives’ most recent film “New Orleans”, and Michael Kantor’s Emmy Award winning series “Broadway”.

Teese works as musical director for Carly Simon, as arranger for Dave Stewart and other Rockers, and he is looking forward to his job as music supervisor on Julie Taymor’s upcoming Broadway production of “Spider-Man: the Opera,” with music by Bono & the Edge.

 

Writer, performer, and music producer T BONE BURNETT (Songs Producer) was born Joseph Henry Burnett, January 14, 1948 in St. Louis, Missouri. He grew up in Fort Worth, Texas, where he began making records in 1965, producing Texas blues, country, and rock and roll bands, and occasionally, himself. He now lives and works in Los Angeles as a producer and recording artist.

In 1975, he toured with Bob Dylan's Rolling Thunder Review tour before forming his own group, the Alpha Band, with others from the tour. Burnett returned to recording solo in the late 1970s and has gone on to record numerous critically acclaimed albums – including 1992's Grammy nominated “The Criminal Under My Own Hat” – under his own name. His most recent album is 2006’s The True False Identity, his first album of new original songs in 14 years. Burnett also released last year “Twenty Twenty – The Essential T Bone Burnett,” a 40-song retrospective spanning his entire career of music-making.

In the last nine years, he has written music for two Sam Shepard plays – Tooth of Crime (Second Dance) and The Late Henry Moss – and in 2005 composed music for a production of Bertolt Brecht's Mother Courage and Her Children by Chicago's Steppenwolf Theatre Company.

A prolific and versatile producer, T Bone Burnett has produced highly successful recordings for Sam Phillips, Elvis Costello, Roy Orbison, Counting Crows, the Wallflowers and Gillian Welch, among others. He was musical director for the concert film Roy Orbison and Friends: Black and White Night, which featured Orbison and an all-star band of Bruce Springsteen, Elvis Costello, Tom Waits, Bonnie Raitt, Burnett, and many others.

Burnett recently won a Grammy for his work on the soundtrack to the hit motion picture Walk the Line, for which he also composed the original score. Burnett won four Grammys, including Producer of the Year, for the Coen Brothers’ film O Brother, Where Art Thou? and its documentary spin-off Down From the Mountain; he also won a Grammy for his work in producing the Tony Bennett and k.d. lang album “A Wonderful World.” He received an Oscar® nomination for Best Original Song (with Elvis Costello) for “Scarlet Tide,” performed by Allison Krauss, from the acclaimed soundtrack he produced for Cold Mountain, directed by Anthony Minghella. He scored and wrote three songs for Wim Wenders' Don't Come Knockin’. Most recently, he collaborated with Elvis Costello on Steve Zaillian's All The King’s Men.

In 2002, Burnett joined forces with the Academy Award®-winning filmmakers Joel and Ethan Coen to form DMZ Records, a joint venture with Columbia Records, and produced the new label's inaugural releases: a new album by the legendary bluegrass musician Ralph Stanley and the Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood soundtrack. DMZ has since released several critically-acclaimed soundtrack albums, produced or executive-produced by Burnett, including Cold Mountain, A Mighty Wind, Crossing Jordan and The Ladykillers (2004), which reunited Burnett with the Coen Brothers for the first time since O Brother, Where Art Thou? Burnett also served as executive roducer for the highly lauded debut album from Ollabelle, released on DMZ/Columbia Records in March 2004. He produced the debut album “Future Perfect” from experimental band Autolux for DMZ/Columbia, which was released in October 2004, as well as the new album from Cassandra Wilson, “Thunderbird,” which was released in March, 2006. He produced a forthcoming project, “Raising Sand,” from Robert Plant and Alison Krauss, and he is currently at work on albums with John Mellencamp and blues legend B.B. King.

 

“ACADEMY AWARD®” and “OSCAR®” are the registered trademarks and service marks of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Adem·s de resuelta, extravagante y altamente teatral, Across the Universe de Revolution Studios es una original pelÌcula musical, que surge de la imaginaciÛn de la reconocida escritora-directora Julie Taymor (Frida, Titus, y del exitoso musical de Broadway “The Lion King”) y de los escritores Dick Clement & Ian La Frenais (The Commitments), que re·ne una historia original y 30 revolucionarias canciones - incluyendo “Hey Jude,” “I Am the Walrus,” y “All You Need is Love” – que definieron una generaciÛn. Taymor dice, “La idea era crear un musical original usando solo las canciones de los Beatles.

Across the Universe es una historia de amor ubicada a finales de los aÒos ‘60 en medio de los turbulentos aÒos de protestas contra la guerra, exploraciÛn mental y el rock 'n roll, donde la pelÌcula se mueve desde los muelles de Liverpool hasta la creativa psicodÈlia del Greenwich Village, desde los disturbios en las calles de Detroit a los valles de la muerte de Vietnam. Los amantes marcados por el destino, Jude (Jim Sturgess) y Lucy (Evan Rachel Wood), junto a un pequeÒo grupo de amigos y m·sicos, se ven envueltos por los emergentes movimientos antibelicosos y contraculturales, con “Dr. Robert” (Bono) y “Mr. Kite” (Eddie Izzard) como sus guÌas. Finalmente tumultuosas fuerzas fuera de su control terminan separando a los jÛvenes amantes, forzando a Jude y Lucy – contra todos los pronÛsticos – que encuentren su propio camino que los lleve a reencontrarse.

Revolution Studios presenta una producciÛn de Matthew Gross/Team Todd, una pelÌcula de Julie Taymor, Across the Universe, protagonizada por Evan Rachel Wood, Jim Sturgess, y Joe Anderson. La pelÌcula est· dirigida por Julie Taymor. Los productores son Suzanne Todd, Jennifer Todd, y Matthew Gross. El guiÛn es de Dick Clement & Ian La Frenais, basado en una historia por Julie Taymor & Dick Clement & Ian La Frenais. Los productores ejecutivos son Derek Dauchy, Rudd Simmons, y Charles Newirth. El director de fotografÌa es Bruno Delbonnel, A.F.C. El diseÒador de producciÛn es Mark Friedberg. El editor es FranÁoise Bonnot, A.C.E. La coreografÌa es de Daniel Ezralow. La banda original es de Elliot Goldenthal, quien tambiÈn produjo las canciones junto a T Bone Burnett y Teese Gohl. El diseÒador de vestuario es Albert Wolsky. Los co-productores son Richard Barratta y Ben Haber. El casting realizado por Bernard Telsey, CSA. distribuye Columbia Pictures.

La pelÌcula tambiÈn tiene como actores invitados a estrellas tan notables como Bono de U2, Salma Hayek, Eddie Izzard y el cantante Joe Cocker.

Across the Universe ha sido clasificada PG-13 por la MPAA por Algo de Contenido sobre Drogas, Desnudez, Sexualidad, Violencia, y Lenguaje Fuerte. La pelÌcula ser· estrenada para limitados compromisos el 14 de Septiembre, y se expande el 21 de Septiembre del 2007.

 

INVESTIGANDO LOS ‘60

Julie Taymor, la original visionaria detr·s de la nueva pelÌcula de Revolution Studios Across the Universe, dice que primeramente ella visualizÛ una pelÌcula que, dicho con sus palabras “investigase los ‘60. DebÌa penetrar dentro de todos los niveles de las canciones de los Beatles. Desde las canciones de amor hasta las canciones polÌticas, la m·sica y la pelÌcula no sÛlo reflejarÌan el microcosmos de la experiencia de un personaje, sino, desde mi perspectiva, tambiÈn representarÌa el macrocosmos de los eventos que ocurrÌan en el mundo.”

Para Taymor, aunque la pelÌcula est· ubicada una generaciÛn atr·s, el hacer que la historia y la pelÌcula fuesen frescas y llenas de vida para los espectadores de hoy en dÌa fue el punto central. “Realmente quiero que los jÛvenes vean la pasiÛn en esta pelÌcula – que vean con cuanto fervor estos personajes se introducÌan a los movimientos sociales asÌ como a la auto exploraciÛn,” cuenta ella “realmente deseo que hable ‘a travÈs del universo’ y a travÈs de las culturas… que cualquier persona pueda identificarse con las situaciones y eventos que est·n ocurriendo en esta pelÌcula.”

Seg·n la productora Jennifer Todd, la pelÌcula representa una postura artÌstica por parte de Taymor. “Sumado a que tiene una visiÛn ·nica, Julie es la m·s trabajadora de las directoras/es con los que he trabajado,” cuenta. “Es una experiencia increÌblemente satisfactoria el trabajar con alguien que maÒana, tarde y noche, vive y respira el cine. Un fin de semana dado, nos fuimos y volvimos para encontrar que una nueva y completa secuencia habÌa sido inventada. Porque ella es asÌ, atrae a la gente que desee trabajar igual de duro que ella para alcanzar su visiÛn.”

El productor Matthew Gross, quien fue el que generÛ el proyecto, est· de acuerdo. “Julie es un tesoro nacional,” dice. “Es una verdadera artista – no solo saca a flote una atractiva visualizaciÛn, sino que tambiÈn tiene el toque justo con los cantantes y bailarines, algo que fue muy necesario para esta pelÌcula. El trabajo que hizo en Titus y Frida muestra su increÌble visiÛn. Y sumado a esto, que todos quieren trabajar con Julie Taymor – y por muy buenas razones – ya que ella es capaz de atraer a los artistas de punta y a increÌbles talentos para que trabajen con ella. Ella es un tremendo punto a favor para la pelÌcula en todos los sentidos.”

A diferencia de la mayorÌa de los musicales, donde una historia viene primero y las canciones son introducidas en momentos claves, las canciones crearon la historia. “Comenzando con m·s de 200 canciones escritas por los Beatles, eventualmente elegimos 30 que sentÌamos contaban de mejor manera la historia de una generaciÛn y de una Època.”

Explica Todd, “La pelÌcula es un musical original y cuenta con una original historia – una que no has visto nunca antes, inspirada en la m·sica de los Beatles de un modo en el que no habÌas escuchado antes.”

“El total concepto de este musical,” explica Taymor, “es el de que las letras de las m·sicas contar·n la historia. Son el libreto, la melodÌa, son la emociÛn de los personajes.”

A pesar que Taymor estaba a principios de su adolescencia en los 60, la historia estuvo inspirada en sus observaciones de niÒa:

“Lucy y Max, el hermano y la hermana, est·n ligeramente inspirados en mis propios hermano y hermana mayores, y yo soy Julia, la pequeÒa niÒa que observa. Durante ese periodo yo era una voyeurista a lo que estaban pasando mis padres con respecto a los adolescentes y luego con los estudiantes universitarios que estaban pasando a travÈs de los radicales movimientos polÌticos: los reclutamientos, los hippies, las drogas. AsÌ que yo estuve ahÌ – yo misma no me zambullÌ, pero lo observÈ.”

Taymor admiraba el espÌritu abierto de la Època. “La gente realmente se jugaba por las cosas,” cuenta ella. “Como dice Lucy, ‘Me acostarÌa frente a un tanque si eso lograse traer a mi hermano de vuelta de la guerra.’ Y por supuesto Jude responde, ‘Pero eso no lo lograr·,’ y ella se pone triste y dice, ‘øSignifica eso que piensas que no lo deberÌa intentar?’ Me emociona el hecho de que en esa Època la gente lo intentaba.”

Pero definitivamente Taymor no visualizaba el proyecto como una pieza de nostalgia. Resalta ella que muchos de los temas que enfrentaban los jÛvenes de los 60 son todavÌa muy relevantes hoy en dÌa. El objetivo de los realizadores era el de traducir la pasiÛn y sentimiento de los 60 y que resuene del modo m·s contempor·neo posible. La razÛn para hacer una pelÌcula como esta, en su cabeza, era la urgencia de los temas. “Constantemente tienes que revisitar estas historias para que se reflejen en tu presente y de verdad te hagan pensar, ‘øQuÈ es diferente hoy en dÌa?’” dice Taymor. “Esa Època es manifiestamente importante para nuestra Època.”

Para poder dar vida a esa Època, Taymor y los guionistas Dick Clement & Ian La Frenais crearon una nueva historia completamente, usando las canciones como guÌas. “Personajes fueron creados para las canciones,” continua Taymor. “Por ejemplo, el personaje Prudence: Me encantÛ la idea de tomar ‘I Want to Hold Your Hand’ y d·rselo a una inocente chirolera en Ohio.”

La canciÛn comienza con la joven cant·ndola de manera quejumbrosa al costado de una cancha de football. “No cambiamos las letras,” cuenta Taymor, “pero a la mitad del tema, te das cuenta que ella no est· enamorada del quarterback – est· enamorada de la rubia chirolera ubicada a su lado. De pronto la canciÛn trabaja de un modo completamente diferente, debido a que trata sobre el amor reprimido. Hacia el final de esta canciÛn, esta joven, que ni siquiera sabe quÈ es lo que est· sintiendo, abandona su casa. Hace dedo para llegar hasta Nueva York. Sin necesidad de tener que entrar en el pasado del personaje, sin necesidad de tener que ver a su madre y a su padre y su historia de vida, la canciÛn lo dice todo.”

“A medida que recorrÌamos los personajes, las canciones iban surgiendo,” contin·a Taymor. “En la historia, Max est· a punto de ser reclutado por el EjÈrcito. EscuchÈ docenas de canciones hasta que por fin lleguÈ a ‘I Want You’ y quedÛ registrada en mi cabeza, ‘Mi Dios, “I Want You,” øNo es ese acaso el gancho del TÌo Sam?’” Encajaba perfectamente.

A medida que la historia comenzaba a crecer, de este modo org·nico, Taymor se dejaba llevar hacia donde las canciones la guiaran. En muchos casos, las canciones se moverÌan hacia otros personajes y tomarÌan m·ltiples significados, como se da en el caso de “I Want You,” que comienza con el reclutamiento de Max y contin·a con una escena m·s erÛtica entre los personajes de Jo-Jo y Sadie. En algunos casos, las canciones parecÌan m·s momentos privados, y del modo como ocurre con la melodÌa en una Ûpera, expresaban pensamientos internos.

Y en cambio en otros casos, como con “Revolution,” lo frontal de la letra los llevÛ a retratar la emociÛn de una escena de un modo mucho m·s fuerte que lo que hubiese permitido un di·logo. “Cuando Jude canta ‘Revolution,’ est· de hecho irrumpiendo en la oficina de Reformas Democr·ticas para los Estudiantes, yendo directamente hasta Lucy, y usando la emociÛn de la m·sica y esas letras para expresarse en vez de decirlo a travÈs de un di·logo directo,” resalta Taymor. “Contin·a cantando debido a que se encuentra en un estado muy fuera de lo com·n; est· en un estado elevado que para el final de la canciÛn har· que lo golpeen y lo tiren afuera. Realmente nos ayuda a encapsular el tiempo, debido a que la m·sica te ayuda a pasar de manera muy r·pida a travÈs de un estado emocional dado y pasar a otro nivel que es muy, muy elevado y muy dram·tico.”

 

SOBRE EL ELENCO Y LOS ACTORES INVITADOS

Con los personajes creados a partir del material bruto sacado de las canciones, los realizadores pusieron especial importancia en elegir a los mejores actores y cantantes que pudiesen encontrar para los papeles.

Como resultado, la ·nica miembro del elenco con m·s experiencia fÌlmica es Evan Rachel Wood. Taymor destaca, “Ella es tan joven y nadie realmente la ha visto convertirse en una mujer – en esta pelÌcula, ella crece hasta aparecer como una mujer adulta hecha y derecha. Ella va a ser un gran descubrimiento para la gente. Adem·s, nadie siquiera sabÌa que ella podÌa cantar.”

Entre todas las canciones que ella canta en Across the Universe, la que ella veÌa como el mayor desafÌo era “If I Fell.” “Jam·s tuve ning·n tipo de entrenamiento en canto, y esa canciÛn llega muy, muy alto. Es adem·s la canciÛn m·s emocional que canto. AsÌ que tuve que trabajar para el personaje, para ese momento dado, la parte emocional y adem·s poner esa emociÛn en el canto – mientras debÌa recordar lo que mi voz debÌa hacer,” cuenta Wood. “Mientras aprendÌa la canciÛn e iba descubriendo como cantarla, trajeron al cuarto a Jim Sturgess para que se la cantase a Èl. Fue la vez que mejor la cantÈ – sacÛ mi pensamiento de lo que estaba haciendo y me liberÛ.”

Wood destaca que no sÛlo con Sturgess compartiÛ una conexiÛn, sino que tambiÈn con el resto del elenco – y fue algo recÌproco. “Julie sabe como elegir el elenco para una pelÌcula,” cuenta, “y sabÌa que todos trabajarÌamos muy bien juntos debido a que todos somos muy similares. Durante la producciÛn, sentÌ como que habÌa ganado hermanos y hermanas; todos son personas sumamente interesantes y todos tienen espectaculares historias de vida.”

Llamados abiertos de casting fueron realizados en Inglaterra para el papel de Jude. Taymor cuenta que al escuchar un casete de Jim Sturgess ya pudo saber que Èl era el indicado, incluso antes de conocerlo en persona.

Taymor y su colaborador de toda la vida, el compositor Elliot Goldenthal, fueron muy quisquillosos sobre que clase de voces querÌan, explica ella. “No querÌamos voces musicales tipo teatrales, y tampoco querÌamos voces poperas. Jim simplemente encajÛ de inmediato. Jim ha estado en una banda de rock y es actor. …l simplemente canta con tal soltura que te hace sentir como que el personaje te est· hablando solo a vos. Tiene una bella voz – y no hay una desconexiÛn entre su voz cuando canta y cuando habla. Jim puede pasar directamente de estar hablando a cantar.”

Sturgess dice que es muy afortunado de poder hacer su debut en un proyecto de un gran estudio con Across the Universe y con un talento de la talla de Julie Taymor. “Ella es brillante,” cuenta. “Es una interminable cabeza productora de ideas. Tiene una idea definida sobre quÈ es lo que quiere ver, pero adem·s le da a sus actores el suficiente espacio para que traigan sus propias ideas – ella simplemente lo mete todo adentro.”

El trabajar con las estrellas que hicieron los papeles de actores invitados fue tambiÈn una experiencia alucinante. “Un dÌa, estaba sentado por ahÌ, mirando a Bono cantar ‘I am the Walrus’ – asÌ que ya de por si estaba teniendo una muy buena tarde – y luego Èl se me acerca y me pregunta si me gustarÌa ir a su concierto al final de la semana. øQuÈ iba yo a decirle? ‘Disculpa, tengo otros planes?’ No, me pare ahÌ y dije, ‘Me encantarÌa, gracias… Sr. Bono.” Otro buen momento para Sturgess fue el dÌa que Bono vino al set y le dijo al joven actor que le gustaba su voz.

Max es norteamericano, pero Taymor no encontrÛ un actor norteamericano que tuviese las cualidades que ella querÌa para el papel. Cuando conociÛ a Joe Anderson, otro brit·nico, le pareciÛ interesante que Èl ni siquiera quisiese audicionar para el rol de Jude: “Cuando fui a Londres Èl audicionÛ para mi, pero me dijo, sabes, “Yo no soy ese personaje – soy Max,” asÌ que incluso Èl sabÌa que su propia personalidad encajaba mejor con eso. Y se parecÌa a Evan, asÌ que fue la mezcla perfecta para que interpretase a su hermano.”

Para Sadie, cuenta Taymor, “SabÌa que Dana Fuchs y yo creamos el papel para ella. Dana habÌa hecho un demo para Elliot para otro proyecto, y ella tiene esa voz que no has escuchado desde Janis.”

Fuchs cuenta, “SentÌ como que estaba dentro de una pelÌcula cuando estaba al telÈfono hablando con Julie y ella me estaba diciendo que conseguÌ el papel. Nadie estaba ahÌ para atestiguarlo. Me quedÈ en shock – adem·s de conseguir el papel, el saber que ella lo escribiÛ para mÌ, fue increÌble. Ella me dijo que no habÌa otra Sadie.”

El socio de Sadie en la pelÌcula es el personaje de Jo-Jo, quien tambiÈn es un m·sico. “…l viene de Detroit, viene de la m·sica soul, y se engancha con estos descarriados y se vuelve parte de la banda de Sadie. …l se transforma frente a ti, pasando al pelo engominado hacia atr·s a un afro salvaje.” Para interpretar a Jo-Jo, Taymor llamÛ a Martin Luther McCoy, un cantante y guitarrista de Nueva York sin mucha experiencia en la actuaciÛn. Taymor cuenta que Èl demostrÛ ser “un fenomenal actor” asÌ como m·sico.

T.V. Carpio, que interpreta a Prudence, fue otro descubrimiento. Adem·s de tener una bella voz musical, T.V. es bailarina y una ex patinadora sobre hielo. “Hice que Prudence fuese una patinadora dentro de las escenas del circo debido a que ella podÌa patinar sobre hielo. Luego pensÈ, ‘Bueno, ella va a ser la animadora, en vez de solo mirar a la animadora, debido a que se maneja tan bien con el fÌsico,” cuenta Taymor. “A medida que vas conociendo a los actores, vas creando m·s y m·s para ellos.”

El sentimiento fue mutuo. Carpio recuerda, “Como me dijo Jim, al principio de todo: ‘Simplemente estoy ansioso por hacer todo lo que Julie requiere de nosotros.’ Dese·bamos con gran intensidad que su visiÛn cobre vida. Cuando ella nos decÌa lo que veÌa, nunca era simplemente lo que estaba escrito en un pedazo de papel – siempre era algo que estaba completamente fuera de este mundo… nos sentimos muy honrados de poder ser parte de eso. No podÌamos creer que este era nuestro trabajo.”

Wood est· de acuerdo. “Julie de verdad saca lo mejor que tienes dentro tuyo,” cuenta ella. “Ella te puede guiar a hacer cosas que tu ni sabÌas que podÌas hacer. Me encanta como saca a flote eso de las personas. No puedes estar atemorizado y no puedes tener nada de miedo. Ella te lanza a lo m·s profundo y de alg·n modo est·s ahÌ y te pones a nadar, y te das cuenta de que, ‘yo no sabÌa que podÌa hacer esto.’”

El elenco se completa con algunos muy especiales actores invitados para los papeles secundarios. Bono, quien se encontraba en el medio de una gira mundial con U2, logrÛ calzar dos dÌas para estar en el set como el “Dr. Robert.” TenÌa su concierto en el Madison Square Garden hasta tarde de noche antes de recibir sus tempraneros llamados para estar en el set. “Armamos juntos el personaje, entre Julie y yo,” cuenta la estrella de rock, activista, y actor por primera vez. “Ella querÌa que el mismo fuese verdadero a su tiempo y periodo, asÌ que lo hicimos una especie de Neal Cassady de la costa oeste.” Cassady, por supuesto, fue la inspiraciÛn para On the Road de Jack Kerouac; una figura clave dentro de la contracultura de los 60, fue adem·s un autor que tenÌa lo suyo, y el chofer de Furthur, el bus de los Bromistas Alegres de Ken Kesey). “Analizamos las filmaciones sobre Èl y el modo en que trabajaba, y es casi como si quisiese ser una estrella de rock – Èl tiene todos estos movimientos espasmÛdicos, mucha auto confianza, siempre interpreta para las chicas ubicadas en el lugar. Para ser mi primer papel como actor, pensÈ que este serÌa interesante y un poquito especial.”

Salma Hayek, amiga de Taymor y la estrella de Frida nominada al OscarÆ, interpreta a las sensuales enfermeras bailarinas en “Happiness is a Warm Gun.” Taymor le preguntÛ a Hayek si querÌa interpretar a una enfermera y Hayek le dijo que querÌa interpretar a las cinco – algo que fue logrado con el trabajo de control de movimiento de c·mara (lo que requiriÛ que Hayek repitiese su pieza de baile de manera muy cuidadosa durante dos largos dÌas para asÌ poder crear la ilusiÛn de estas cinco atractivas enfermeras). Eddie Izzard interpreta el papel del cabecilla del circo en “Being For the Benefit of Mr. Kite!” y Joe Cocker trabajÛ en el medio de varias noches para completar sus m·ltiples papeles de cantante vagabundo, proxeneta, y hippie en “Come Together.”

 

REINTERPRETANDO LAS CANCIONES

Sumado al tener una historia que tuviese los suficientes niveles para que le hiciese justicia a las canciones, el otro elemento clave para la pelÌcula fue la interpretaciÛn musical, cuenta Taymor. “Realmente daba miedo el tener el legado de la m·sica de los Beatles sobre tus hombros, ya que es el Santo Grial,” cuenta ella. “Es tan importante para tanta gente, y los originales fueron perfectos. SabÌamos desde el principio que no querÌamos competir con las versiones de los Beatles,” cuenta Taymor. Ella sintiÛ que el mejor modo de honrar a la banda era el tener a las canciones como el corazÛn y la estrella de la pelÌcula, emanando directamente desde los personajes.

Para interpretar la m·sica, Taymor se apoyÛ en su colaborador de confianza de toda la vida, Elliot Goldenthal. “A pesar que Elliot es un compositor y no hay canciones para ser compuestas, sus arreglos y su entendimiento del drama y de los personajes son grandiosos. He trabajado con Èl durante 20 aÒos y tengo plena confianza y una total admiraciÛn por su trabajo. SabÌa que Èl encontrarÌa un modo nuevo de interpretar las canciones; al ubicarlas con nuevos arreglos, la m·sica volverÌa a sentirse fresca – no una versiÛn nueva, sino diferente.”

Goldenthal y Taymor tambiÈn trajeron al equipo al reconocido productor de m·sica rock T Bone Burnett y a la productora Teese Gohl, quien ya habÌa trabajado como productora musical junto a Goldenthal en m·s de 20 pelÌculas. Goldenthal, Burnett, y Gohl trabajaron en conjunto en la producciÛn musical.

Cada canciÛn fue analizada: quiÈn la estarÌa cantando, cu·l era el contenido, el sentimiento que se requerÌa de la misma para la pelÌcula, y el tiempo disponible. Goldenthal destaca, “Todo el mundo conoce muy bien la m·sica de los Beatles, es casi como un fantasma dentro del cuarto. Todas las pequeÒas perlitas que ellos interpretaban, los complementos especÌficos de guitarra, los complementos de la baterÌa – todo el mundo los llena cuando escuchan una de las canciones. Las canciones ya fueron hechas de modo perfecto por los Beatles – son interpretaciones definitivas. AsÌ que el desafÌo estuvo en tratar de encontrar un modo honesto – con uno mismo – de llegar al corazÛn de estas canciones y tratar de encontrar otras maneras de complementar las bellas palabras y la m·sica.”

Gohl recuerda, “Recuerdo el primer mail que recibÌ de T Bone que decÌa, ‘Es crucial’ – en negrita – ‘que usemos ·nicamente equipos de grabaciÛn que fueron hechos antes de 1970.’” A diferencia de muchos ingenieros y productores, que se apoyan en los softwares de computadora para manipular el sonido, cuenta Gol que Burnett – quien ganÛ un Grammy por su trabajo en la banda de sonido, disco de platino en ventas de O Brother, Where Art Thou? – prefiere un acercamiento que regrese a las raÌces. “A Èl le interesa mucho encontrar el sonido de un instrumento, y quÈ es lo que pasa si tomas ese instrumento que era de los 60 y lo ejecutas con un viejo micrÛfono y en una vieja m·quina an·loga de grabaciÛn y luego lo escuchas. …l experimentaba, poniendo el micrÛfono en diferentes lugares, incluso en cuartos diferentes,” para asÌ lograr los mismos resultados que el software.

En lo que respecta a trabajar con Goldenthal, Gohl dice, “Elliot es ·nico en todos los sentidos, pero el verlo como productor de rock ‘n’ roll es todavÌa otra cosa que me vuela la cabeza.”

Por supuesto que no era suficiente simplemente salir con nuevos arreglos para las canciones. Debido a que las letras de las canciones cuentan la historia de la pelÌcula, era crucial para Taymor que las interpretaciones tuviesen relevancia e inmediatez con las escenas que los rodeaban. Con ese objetivo en mente, los realizadores decidieron hacer la pelÌcula con la mayor cantidad posible de canto en vivo. Ella le entrega el crÈdito a otro de los miembros de su equipo, el mezclador de sonido Tod Maitland, por hacer que esto funcione.

“…l es otro genio,” cuenta Taymor, debido a que “gran parte de la pelÌcula es en vivo.”

Maitland, quien es un tres veces nominado al Premio de la AcademiaÆ, habÌa trabajado de manera m·s reciente en el m·s tradicional musical The Producers, pero Across the Universe requerÌa un acercamiento completamente diferente. Explica del porquÈ una movida tan radical era necesaria: “En la mayorÌa de los musicales, el actor habla y luego pasa a una voz cantada. Para la mayorÌa de la gente, la voz cantada es una voz completamente diferente – algo que hicieron en un estudio dos o tres meses antes. Te saca afuera de la pelÌcula. En Across the Universe, querÌamos que el ambiente se mantuviese real. Cuando haces la transiciÛn de hablar a cantar, queremos que esos momentos fluyan libremente, para que asÌ no estÈs saliendo y entrando en diferentes cualidades de sonido – te quieres mantener dentro de la escena. Sumado a esto, debido al hecho que en esta pelÌcula las letras musicales funcionan como di·logos, uno quiere escuchar el pequeÒo eco de las paredes, quieres escuchar a la gente moviÈndose alrededor. No quieres un sonido muy cerrado, tipo estudio.”

Los actores comenzaron el proceso pre-grabando sus canciones; esto les darÌa una idea de cÛmo irÌan sus interpretaciones y servirÌan de apoyo para el proceso de ediciÛn. En estas sesiones, cada uno de los actores ejecutaron las canciones en tres diferentes pistas: la primera con un micrÛfono de estudio, la segunda con un micrÛfono de exteriores, como el usado en un set, y la tercera un micrÛfono “lavalier”, tambiÈn usado en el set.

Durante la toma, el set debÌa encontrarse en un completo silencio para poder grabar las interpretaciones vocales en vivo. Todos los actores llevaban pequeÒos audÌfonos de oÌdo, llamados “earwigs,” que les permitÌan cantar junto a sus pre-grabadas interpretaciones. La pista pre-grabada le darÌa a los actores una guÌa a seguir y permitiÛ algo de libertad dentro de la ediciÛn del sonido, seg·n Maitland. “Si un actor gira su cabeza y sale fuera del micrÛfono, podÌamos traer adentro una voz pre-grabada y poner eso encima. O si hay alg·n ruido encima de una toma que a los realizadores realmente les gustÛ, podÌamos pasar a una voz pre-grabada.” Sin embargo, destaca Èl, esas son las excepciones. “El diseÒo completo de la pelÌcula est· armado para usar lo m·s posible las voces en vivo.”

El proceso que resultaba medio maÒoso fue transformado en algo m·s sencillo gracias al cinematÛgrafo, Bruno Delbonnel, y su diseÒador de iluminaciÛn, John DeBlau, quien estuvo en constante consulta con el departamento de sonido, para que le digan cuando poner las luces, de modo a ayudarles a mantener el micrÛfono lo m·s cerca posible de las cabezas de los actores. Para un resultado Ûptimo, el micrÛfono debÌa estar a solo 38 centÌmetros del actor, la misma distancia usada en las sesiones de pre-grabado.

 

SOBRE LA COREOGRAFÕA

Al igual que la m·sica en Across the Universe serÌa una radical reinvenciÛn de las muy conocidas canciones, la pelÌcula tambiÈn necesitaba una visiÛn ·nica en lo referente a la coreografÌa. La pelÌcula debÌa ser tanto una fiesta para los ojos como para los oÌdos.

“No querÌa que este fuese un musical ‘bailable’,” cuenta Taymor. A pesar de que hay una buena cantidad de baile dentro de la pelÌcula, dice, “Discutimos mucho sobre usar los movimientos que uno hace en su dÌa a dÌa como el vocabulario.” Para traer esta visiÛn a la vida, Taymor llamÛ a Daniel Ezralow un coreÛgrafo con el que ya habÌa colaborado en numerosos otros trabajos.

“Danny domina el baile moderno teatral asÌ como el popero, y el circense, y el acrob·tico, y los movimientos del dÌa a dÌa,” cuenta ella. “Si miras en ‘With a Little Help from My Friends,” la coreografÌa es gente desliz·ndose por las barandillas, saltando y cayendo sobre cojines. Si miras ‘Come Together,’ ves a la gente en la calle, caminando cada uno con su portafolio. Algunas secuencias son m·s ‘bailables’ que otras, pero las piezas que dan la sensaciÛn que est·n viviendo de un modo org·nico a partir de los movimientos naturales, funcionan de un modo precioso.”

“Desde el mismo comienzo, querÌa que Across the Universe fuese completamente naturalista y diferente a cualquier otro musical,” cuenta Ezralow. “Eso lo dije fuerte, y luego quedÈ atrapado. HabÌan testigos!”

La idea de Ezralow era que la pelÌcula tomase las claves a partir del modo como nos movemos hoy en dÌa en el mundo. “Todo el mundo anda con sus iPods prendidos – se cierran al mundo,” dice Èl. “AsÌ como lo haces tu, a medida que vas mirando a la otra gente, es como caminar a travÈs de una pelÌcula. Es una experiencia alterada. Cada dÌa, mientras viajaba en el subterr·neo hacia el set, escuchaba las canciones de Across the Universe y me imaginaba los movimientos.”

“Julie nos empuja para que veamos las cosas de un modo diferente,” dice Ezralow. “Cuando eres extranjero en un paÌs, a veces captas mejor cÛmo es ese paÌs, m·s que uno que ha vivido ahÌ toda su vida, debido a que lo est·s mirando con nuevos ojos. AsÌ que es una pequeÒa trampita que me pongo a mi mismo – trato de ser un extraÒo para sÌ poder bailar todo el tiempo.”

Por supuesto que la pelÌcula presenta un par de secuencias de baile tradicionales. Para estos, Ezralow audicionÛ a alguno de los mejores bailarines de Broadway y del mundo para que llenen m·s de 350 roles de bailarines. El proceso del casting fue muchas veces difÌcil debido a que muchos de estos bailarines se encontraban apareciendo en espect·culos cada noche. Para la secuencia de “inducciÛn central,” ubicada al ritmo de la canciÛn “I Want You,” los bailarines que interpretaban a los “sargentos” debÌan reportarse a las 3.30 a.m. para iniciar el complicado proceso de de maquillaje y prÛtesis – y muchos habÌan estado bailando sobre un escenario en Broadway hasta las 11 p.m. la noche antes.

“Mark Friedberg, el diseÒador de producciÛn, Julie y yo nos sentamos y hablamos sobre la secuencia desde muy temprano,” recuerda Ezralow. “Fue un bello torbellino e improvisado dÌa. Todos contribuyeron con algo – Julie, el concepto; yo, el baile; Mark, el diseÒo. La secuencia termina siendo surrealista y juguetonamente artÌstica, pero al mismo tiempo poderosa y al grano.”

“Come Together” representa el otro verdadero punto alto de la coreografÌa dentro de la pelÌcula. En un momento dado, 140 personas se mueven a unÌsono en el centro de Manhattan; en otro momento dado durante la canciÛn los realizadores envisionaron un equipo cronometrado estilo Rube Goldberg a la canciÛn. Ezralow dice que la canciÛn es “un punto medio dentro de la pelÌcula; definimos quÈ ocurrÌa en Nueva Cork durante los 60.”

 

SOBRE LA PRODUCCI”N

Cruzando la frontera, Taymor atrajo un excepcional equipo de colaboradores para Across The Universe. Para el importante rol de cinematÛgrafo, eligiÛ al francÈs Bruno Delbonnel, quien a pesar de haber recientemente comenzado a filmar pelÌculas dentro de los EEUU, fue ya dos veces nominado al Premio de la AcademiaÆ.

Taymor recuerda: “Bruno, en nuestra primera entrevista dijo, ‘Odio los musicales.’ PensÈ, ‘øBien, ahora quÈ pienso yo de eso? Eso es interesante.’ Y pensÈ, Èl ha hecho AmÈlie y A Very Long Engagement, estas dos increÌbles pelÌculas teatrales. Tiene una increÌble sensaciÛn de la luz y la fotografÌa. ConocÌa esa dura, percepciÛn europea dentro de Èl: Èl iba a querer que fuese una pelÌcula seria, no superflua, que estuviese la oscuridad ahÌ donde yo quisiera que estÈ, pero tambiÈn tendrÌa esa sensaciÛn juguetona y teatral que era muy importante.”

Mark Friedberg (Far From Heaven, The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou, The Producers) se desempeÒÛ como diseÒador de producciÛn. Para Friedberg, fue una especial oportunidad para trabajar con Taymor, una directora que es una de las m·s creativas diseÒadoras teatrales de nuestro tiempo. Destaca, “Julie Taymor tiene sueÒos que son mejores que cualquier cosa que yo pudiese llegar a diseÒar.” Taymor llegÛ una maÒana y le describiÛ la imagen de las mujeres vietnamitas bailando en el agua como parte del montaje para la canciÛn “Across the Universe,” que ella habÌa soÒado la noche antes. “Eso no es justo,” rÌe Èl “yo quiero ser capaz de hacer eso.”

Friedberg cuenta que las fortalezas m·s grandes de Taymor son que “ella es muy valiente y est· comprometida a seguir sus ideas hasta el final. No tiene miedo de que puedan fallar.” De hecho, dice Èl, su ·nico miedo es no ir lo suficientemente lejos. “Ella tiene miedo de que nuestras ideas puedan no ser interesantes, o de que no nos estemos esforzando lo suficiente, o desafi·ndonos lo suficiente. Es una increÌble e inspiradora manera de trabajar.”

Como resultado, Friedberg dice, su desafÌo m·s grande en Across the Universe fue no tanto el proceso tÈcnico de realizar la visiÛn de Taymor, sino estar a la altura de sus expectativas de crear un trabajo completamente nuevo y original. “Ella me dejaba salir y ver si encontraba cualquier cosa que a ella le pudiese gustar, y usualmente las cosas que estaban m·s lejos eran las cosas que le causaban curiosidad. QuerÌa interpretar los 60 de un modo que fuese relevante e interesante. No querÌa recrear nada – querÌa reinventarlo.”

AsÌ que mientras el departamento de arte de Friedberg comenzÛ con una tremenda cantidad de investigaciÛn histÛrica, tambiÈn tuvo un poco de libertad artÌstica para reinterpretar los 60, y meter otras influencias. Friedberg y Taymor se pasaron mirando gran cantidad de arte del graffiti desde los 80 hasta nuestros dÌas buscando inspiraciÛn para el arte de Jude y mucho del barrio del centro del East Village. Un ejemplo de cÛmo el diseÒo de producciÛn muchas veces “reinventarÌa” los 60 fue el “bus m·gico” del Dr. Robert. Como Dr. Robert est· inspirado en Neal Cassady, la figura de la vida real que manejÛ el famoso micro de Ken Kesey Furthur, ese bus se convirtiÛ en el punto de partida para el diseÒo; sin embargo, a Taymor le pareciÛ que se veÌa un poco viejo. Le encantÛ la versiÛn cool y contempor·nea de Friedberg del “inspirado en Basquiat.” El arte del graffiti no es verdadero al periodo, pero Taymor prefiriÛ ese lado m·s crudo, y con sabor a calle a la m·s dulce y floreada, y m·s estereotipada mirada de los 60, y esto se convirtiÛ en un elemento muy ·til para el diseÒo.

“Siendo ella misma una diseÒadora, tiene un ojo visual muy fino,” contin·a Friedberg. “Ella tiene una estÈtica muy ponderosa. Ella es operativa, Es adem·s una colaboradora. Siempre pregunta ‘øQuÈ te parece?’ y siempre est· abierta a la mejor idea dentro del cuarto. TenÌamos un vocabulario muy simple. Julie decÌa, ‘Para el circo quiero una paleta tipo Matisse,’ y yo sabÌa exactamente sobre quÈ estaba hablando.”

Tal vez no tan sorpresivamente, Friedberg estaba m·s ansioso por una parte especÌfica de la producciÛn: los tÌteres a gran escala de la pelÌcula. Fue junto a un experto diseÒador de tÌteres, Paul Rice, uno de los mejores creadores de tÌteres dentro del teatro, quien habÌa construido 15 de los muÒecos Pumbaa para la producciÛn a nivel mundial de “The Lion King” de Taymor. Rice y su equipo harÌan pequeÒas maquetas de los tÌteres para mostr·rselos a Taymor y ella les daba su parecer, con instrucciones muy especÌficas en lo referente al color, sombreado, y movimiento. Para las escenas del circo – que toman su inspiraciÛn a partir del radical Teatro de Bread & Puppet, fundado en los 60 en la ciudad de Nueva York – Rice tallarÌa un tÌtere durante dos dÌas antes de que un equipo de 13 personas comenzasen el proceso de pintado y colocaciÛn del papel m‚chÈ. Dos de los tÌteres m·s grandes que construyeron fueron una cara de 18 pies de alto en el circo y un hombre caminando de 27 pies de alto para la marcha por la paz. Los gigantes brazos y manos se abrÌan en un radio de 120 pies.

Otro desafÌo fundamental del diseÒo iba a ser encontrar la mirada de y para el trabajo de Jude. Un miembro del departamento de arte llamado Don Nace se convirtiÛ en la fuente para el arte de Jude. Friedberg habÌa usado a Nace dentro de su equipo con anterioridad, pero no estaba al tanto de la amplitud de su trabajo hasta que alguien dentro del departamento de arte le sugiriÛ que chequease www.drawingoftheday.com, la p·gina web de Nace. A Taymor le gusto mucho su trabajo asÌ que el importante personaje del arte de Jude fue elegido desde dentro del equipo. Jim Sturgess, el actor que interpreta a Jude, trabajÛ junto a Nace en un estudio, prepar·ndose para las escenas (como “Strawberry Fields”) en donde Jude est· trabajando. “Don me darÌa pequeÒas tareas para que realizase cada dÌa… No sent·bamos y escuch·bamos las grabaciones de Tom Aits y Èl simplemente se sentarÌa en una esquina, esbozando trazos y dibujando y me daba pequeÒas cosas para hacer.”

El centro de inducciÛn y el hospital VA fueron dos de los m·s increÌbles sets escÈnicos. Son “sujetalibros de la experiencia del Ejercito,” cuenta Friedberg. “Lo hicimos muy color verde olivo, negro y blanco. Julie querÌa una experiencia mecanizada para la inducciÛn. Incluso los sargentos son muy robÛticos.” Durante los descansos en la filmaciÛn, los bailarines que interpretaban a los sargentos rompÌan la amenazadora escena usando la cinta transportadora como una “pasarela,” con cada uno tratando de dejar su mejor impresiÛn de pasada como modelo mientras usaban el equipo prostÈtico completo.

El centro de inducciÛn es uno de los momentos que es una verdadera abstracciÛn de la realidad, lo que lo convierte mucho m·s en un n·mero musical. Otro fue “Happiness Is A Warm Gun,” que se desarrolla en un cuarto circular de hospital (y tiene como actor invitado al coreÛgrafo Daniel Ezralow haciendo de un poseÌdo cura bailarÌn).

“Me pareciÛ que era cruel hacer que los muchachos se mirasen los unos a los otros,” cuenta Friedberg. “AsÌ que hicimos el cuarto redondo. Esta tambiÈn fue una referencia histÛrica a las viejas salas de tuberculosis; cuando fueron construidos en la Època victoriana, los cientÌficos creÌan que los gÈrmenes vivÌan en las esquinas. AsÌ que si tenÌas un cuarto redondo no tenÌas esquinas – no tenÌas gÈrmenes. Sobre eso, tenÌamos la idea de que el cuarto podrÌa dar vueltas – la canciÛn serÌa m·s fuerte que la gravedad. Fue una de las primeras discusiones que Julie y yo tuvimos.”

Otro miembro fundamental del equipo de producciÛn fue el legendario diseÒador de vestuario Albert Wolsky (ganador del Premio de la AcademiaÆ por Bugsy y All That Jazz, y un nominado al OscarÆ por otras tres pelÌculas).

Wolsky explica que su desafÌo m·s grande fue el vestir a 5,000 extras dentro de la pelÌcula. “Cualquiera que tiene una parte no hablada, cada uno de ellos, todos deben estar vestidos desde los pies a la cabeza. HacÌamos vestidas en masa cinco veces por semana con equipos de vestidores,” cuenta.

Pero incluso al vestir a las masas, cada detalle es crucial, cuenta Wolsky: “Sin los cabellos y maquillaje adecuados, las ropas no hacen ninguna diferencia. Debes encontrar formas de capturar el periodo sin que sea muy obvia la parte de vestimenta. Mi labor no era hacer un baile de disfraces. QuerÌa que todo fuese como ropas reales, pero que adem·s tuviese esa sensaciÛn que te da otro tiempo.”

Contin·a: “Lo que lo hace interesante para mi es que los comienzos son todos muy especÌficos. Jude viene de Liverpool, asÌ que esa es una imagen. Jo-Jo viene de Detroit, esa es otra imagen. Max y Lucy vienen del ·rea de Massachussets, esa es otra imagen. Y todos ellos convergen en Nueva York en el Village.”

* * *

Gran parte de Across the Universe fue filmada en locaciones especÌficas – m·s de 50 locaciones en 60 dÌas, m·s que nada dentro del ·rea de la ciudad de Nueva York. Coordinando esta complicada filmaciÛn estaba el Primer Asistente al Director Geoff Hansen, quien cuenta, “Julie es una de las m·s creativas y artÌsticas directoras con las que he trabajado en toda mi vida. Tiene una visiÛn que me vuela la cabeza. Puede tener esta visiÛn, digamos, de damas vietnamitas flotando en un lago con mascaras junto a ellas, y yo soy el tipo que tiene que resolver como llevar al equipo hasta ahÌ y filmarlo y donde vamos a comer y todo lo dem·s que tenga que ver con ejecutar esa idea.”

El gerente de locaciones Rob Striem destaca: “En muchas pelÌculas tienes pocas locaciones donde puedes ubicarte y ponerte cÛmodo. En esta pelÌcula, cada uno de los sets era para uno, dos a lo sumo tres dÌas, asÌ que est·bamos constantemente saltando de un lado para el otro.”

Muchos de los sets en donde se iba a filmar solo por un dÌa o dos requerÌan de dos a cuatro semanas de preparaciÛn. Cada dÌa que el equipo se encontraba filmando en un set, podÌan estar de manera simult·nea preparando otros cuatro sets y marcando dos que ya estaban completos – todos al rededor de la ciudad de Nueva York. Y este trabajo no era uno simple, como el pintar paredes y vestir una sala, cuenta Striem, sino “hacer que el sur del Bronx se vea como Detroit con 50 negocios activos.”

De hecho, la compaÒÌa de filmaciÛn creÛ tantos mundos diferentes - Detroit, Vietnam, Washington D.C., los suburbios de Massachussets, la granja Muscoot, donde ubicaron el circo, y otros “m·gicos” ambientes – todos dentro del ·rea de la ciudad de Nueva York.

La calle Rivington en el lado Este m·s bajo de Manhattan fue una de las locaciones m·s grandes para la pelÌcula. El lindo y artÌstico barrio fue transformado en una ampliada versiÛn de la escena del East Village de los 60. Algunos negocios reales del St. Mark’s Place que de hecho existieron fueron retratados, pero el departamento de arte lo mezclÛ e hizo que el ·rea fuese m·s colorida y exagerada que cualquier cosa que hubiese existido en Nueva York en esa Època. Gran parte del set de la calle Rivington fue de hecho inspirada por el distrito de Haight Ashbury en San Francisco, cuenta Friedberg. “Tal vez no exista gran cosa dentro de esa locaciÛn que no existiese en alg·n lugar, pero lo que sÌ es seguro es que no existÌa todo junto. Realizamos un collage impresionista del mundo de la auto expresiÛn juvenil.”

El set abarcaba tres cuadras; desde la Attorney Street a la Norfolk Street en Rivington, luego una media cuadra hacia el Norte y hacia el Sur de la Clinton Street. La intersecciÛn de Rivington/Clinton era el mayor cruce de caminos, donde los bailarines harÌan su n·mero de “Come Together” y donde varias otras escenas fueron montadas.

El barrio estuvo extremadamente colaborador con la explosiÛn psicodÈlica. Los diarios locales animaban a la gente a que se diese una vuelta y vea los sets mientras estos aun estaban armadas, y luego que la filmaciÛn terminÛ, varios restaurantes dentro del barrio eligieron dejar las coloridas pinturas y murales.

Algo similar pasÛ en la parte baja de la Quinta Avenida, cerca de la Washington Square Park, donde una marcha por la paz al son de “Dear Prudence” fue filmada. Los residentes del ·rea querÌan que se dejasen los sÌmbolos de paz y las banderolas contra la Guerra. Fue otro momento donde los 60 y la Època actual parecieron unirse, por asÌ decirlo. De modo similar, el departamento de arte descubriÛ que no necesitaban crear historias ficticias de los periÛdicos como accesorios: tomaron artÌculos actuales sobre la guerra en Irak y cambiaron los nombres dentro de los titulares, y descubrieron que funcionaban de modo perfecto como historias de Vietnam.

En lo referente a las tomas de Vietnam, la producciÛn las armÛ en un dÌa en Moonachie, New Jersey, en un ·rea medio pantanosa cerca de Meadowlands Arena. La producciÛn tambiÈn se fue a New Jersey para filmar “A Little Help from My Friends” en Princeton. En estas escenas, Joe Anderson tuvo la oportunidad de realizar algo de trabajo de doble, disparando un arma en la secuencia de Vietnam, desliz·ndose por la barandilla de una escalera de m·rmol de 35 pies de alto en Princeton.

El Sur del Bronx se convirtiÛ en los disturbios de Detroit, de vuelta un masivo desafÌo para un solo dÌa de filmaciÛn. La producciÛn eligiÛ una manzana que la ciudad de Nueva York tiene planes de demoler, asÌ que el desafÌo estaba en hacer que un lado de la cuadra que estaba completamente abandonado, parezca ocupado. Las escenas de Detroit requirieron de 20 a 25 dobles, explosiones, y dobles de apoyo en los techos que disparaban armas. Para el funeral del pequeÒo hermano de Jo-Jo, Taymor querÌa un cementerio que estuviese cerca de una iglesia, pero que estuviese completamente amurallada dentro de una ubicaciÛn urbana. La producciÛn armÛ el cementerio con la iglesia en un estacionamiento, ya que nada como eso existÌa.

Washington D.C. tambiÈn fue recreado en la parte alta de Manhattan, en Grant’s Tomb, y los disturbios de los estudiantes de la Universidad de Columbia funcionaron perfectamente en el Museo de la Ciudad de Nueva York.

Durante la filmaciÛn, Wood y Sturgess acuÒaron una frase para describir la a veces sobrecogedora naturaleza del proyecto. “Jim y yo tenÌamos este chiste- lo llam·bamos un momento A travÈs del Universo, cuando de pronto par·bamos y realmente pens·bamos en lo que est·bamos haciendo,” cuenta Wood. “Nos hacÌa llorar.”

Wood tuvo esa experiencia a principios de la filmaciÛn, haciendo “Let It Be,” en la escena del funeral de su novio de secundaria. Ya habÌan filmado la escena donde los soldados llegan a la puerta y les cuentan que Daniel ha muerto; “PensÈ que ahÌ ya lo habÌa sacado todo afuera,” cuenta Wood. Cuando llegaron al dÌa de la filmaciÛn del funeral, “SabÌa que era una escena muy difÌcil para Lucy,” contin·a, “pero realmente no iba a desmoronarme ni llorar ni nada. Y luego dijeron ‘acciÛn’ y comenzaron a poner ‘Let It Be’ y comenzaron a doblar la bandera de los EEUU enfrente de mi, y no se que es lo que pasÛ, pero simplemente me desarmÈ; simplemente no pude contenerme. Escuchando la canciÛn, pensÈ, ‘Esto de pronto est· ocurriendo ahora mismo; la gente aun est· viendo esto cada dÌa, y la gente todavÌa tiene que doblar estas banderas norteamericanas frente a estas familias.’ Simplemente me matÛ. Es simplemente que esta pelÌcula ha tenido un efecto muy grande sobre mi en ese aspecto.”

SOBRE EL ELENCO

Evan Rachel Wood (Lucy), una actriz que tiene tanto la habilidad de alcanzar niveles de m·xima profundidad de las emociones como la capacidad de demostrar una elegancia y un porte que va m·s all· de sus aÒos, es una de los jÛvenes talentos m·s brillantes de Hollywood.

Wood fue nominada para los Globos de Oro, para el SAG y para el Critic's Choice Award en 2004 por su papel en el aclamado drama Thirteen, escrito y dirigido por Catherine Hardwicke. Wood que trabajÛ junto a Holly Hunter, protagonizÛ a la adolescente que intenta superar las duras presiones que recibe tanto de sus pares como de sus conflictos familiares.

Ultimamente, la actriz fue vista en el drama de Ryan Murphy, Running with Scissors. Escrito y dirigido por Murphy ("Nip/Tuck") y protagonizado por Wood junto a Annette Bening, Gwyneth Paltrow y Alec Baldwin, el film trata sobre la colorida niÒez de un hombre con una madre bipolar y centrada en si mismo. Recientemente tambiÈn fue vista en el film de David Jacobson, Down in the Valley, junto a Edward Norton, David Morse y Rory Culkin. El film est· ambientado en el Valle de San Fernando y la trama gira en torno a un hombre carism·tico (Norton) quien cree que es un cowboy de los de antes y de la relaciÛn que establece con una joven rebelde, interpretada por Wood.

PrÛximamente Wood ser· vista en el film de Vadim Perelman, In Bloom, junto a Uma Thurman y en la comedia de Michael Cahill, King of California, junto a Michael Douglas. King of California realizÛ su premier en el Festival de Cine de Sundance de 2007 con una excelente crÌtica. Wood pronto comenzar· la producciÛn del film de Charles Sturridge, Bronte, junto a Bryce Dallas Howard.

Otros crÈditos cinematogr·ficos incluyen: el film de Mike Binder The Upside of Anger, junto a Joan Allen y Kevin Costner; el film de Marcos Siega, Pretty Persuasion, junto a Ron Livingston y James Woods; y la aventura del oeste de Ron Howard The Missing, junto a Tommy Lee Jones y Cate Blanchett; la comedia de Andrew Niccol Simone, junto a Al Pacino; Little Secrets, con Vivica A. Fox; Practical Magic con Nicole Kidman y Sandra Bullock; el film de Timothy Hutton Digging to China; y Detour, con Michael Madsen.

En televisiÛn, Wood protagonizÛ la aclamada serie dram·tica de ABC, "Once and Again." Creada por Marshall Herskovitz y Ed Zwick, la serie trata sobre los esfuerzos de dos divorciados (interpretados por Sela Ward y Billy Campbell) por tratar de sostener una nueva relaciÛn a travÈs de los incontables obst·culos impuestos por sus hijos, sus ex esposos y la vida cotidiana. Wood ganÛ celebridad como la sensible hija de Campbell, 'Jessie', para quien le resultaba difÌcil asumir el dolor del divorcio en plena adolescencia. Recientemente apareciÛ como la sobrina del personaje de Allison Janney en las aclamadas series de la NBC, "The West Wing."

Los crÈditos de Wood en teatro incluyen: "The Miracle Worker" para el Theatre in the Park, "A Midsummer Night's Dream" de Shakespeare in the Park y un tour de tres aÒos con "A Christmas Carol."

Entre sus talentos, Wood es cinturÛn negro en Tae Kwon Do y tambiÈn estudiÛ canto y danzas. La actriz vive en Los Angeles.

 

Jim Sturgess (Jude), quien realiza su debut en un papel protagÛnico en Across the Universe, r·pidamente se ha convertido en uno de los actores m·s buscados de Hollywood.

En Febrero, Sturgess protagonizar· The Other Boleyn Girl para el director Justin Chadwick junto a Scarlett Johansson, Natalie Portman, y Eric Bana. El film trata sobre la vida de dos hermanas extremadamente ambiciosas, Mary y Anne Boleyn, quienes rivalizan por la cama y el corazÛn del Rey Enrique VIII. Sturgess interpreta a George Boleyn, el hermano de Mary y Anne.

En Marzo, Sturgess protagonizar· el film del director Robert Luketic, 21, junto a Kate Bosworth, Kevin Spacey y Laurence Fishburne. 21 est· inspirado en cinco estudiantes del MIT quienes han sido entrenados para convertirse en expertos en juegos de cartas y luego deciden viajar a Las Vegas para competir contra los m·s importantes jugadores de Poker, a los que consiguen ganar sin dificultad.

M·s recientemente Sturgess completÛ la producciÛn del film Crossing Over del director Wayne Kramer, donde act·a junto a Harrison Ford, Ashley Judd y Sean Penn. Crossing Over es un drama sobre inmigrantes de diferentes nacionalidades que luchan por obtener un status legal en Los Angeles. El film analiza el tema desde el punto de vista de los inmigrantes, como asÌ tambiÈn de las autoridades de inmigraciÛn que deben hacer cumplir las leyes inmigratorias de la naciÛn. Crossing Over ser· estrenado por The Weinstein Company.

Sturgess reside en Londres, Reino Unido.

 

JOE ANDERSON (Max) actualmente protagoniza el film de Miramax Becoming Jane, y luego protagoniza junto a Samantha Morton Control, un film biogr·fico sobre la banda brit·nica UK band Joy Division, y tambiÈn trabaja para DreamWorks en el film The Ruins. El primer papel de Anderson en la pantalla grande fue junto a Ed Harris en el film de Agnieszka Holland, Copying Beethoven.

Los trabajos teatrales de Anderson incluyen: “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” y “Master and Margherita,” ambos para el Festival de Teatro de Chichester.

Ha aparecido en varia producciones para la televisiÛn brit·nica, incluyendo “Afterlife” para ITV, “A Doll’s House” para BBC, y “Cause Celebre,” “Vacation with Trunks,” y “Midsomer Murders.”

 

Dana Fuchs (Sadie) realiza su debut cinematogr·fico en Across the Universe. En teatro en la ciudad de New York, Fuchs protagonizÛ el Èxito off-Broadway "Love, Janis," sobre la vida de Janis Joplin.

La m·s joven de seis hermanos m·sicos, Dana Fuchs, fue educada en un pequeÒo pueblo en el ·rea rural de Florida rodeada por la m·sica. Fuchs llegÛ sola a la ciudad de Nueva York a los 19 aÒos y se uniÛ al guitarrista Jon Diamond para formar la banda “Dana Fuchs Band”. En un aÒo, la banda ofrecÌa funciones en los mejores clubs de blues de New York, generalmente compartiendo el escenario con artistas como John Popper, James Cotton, y Taj Mahal. Fuchs comenzÛ a escribir sus propias canciones de rock y se convirtiÛ en un cl·sico en el mundo del rock compartiendo cartel con Little Feat, Marianne Faithfull y Etta James. A travÈs de estas actuaciones, ella fue descubierta por los productores de "Love, Janis," quienes la seleccionaron luego de escucharla en la pieza "Piece of My Heart." Sus canciones (que elle escribe como tambiÈn interpreta) fueron exhibidas en el film Sherrybaby.

Las canciones de Fuchs pueden ser escuchadas en los prÛximos CD y DVD "Dana Fuchs Live From NYC", como asÌ tambiÈn en el CD de su debut "Lonely For A Lifetime," que fue estrenado con una respuesta de gran entusiasmo por parte de la prensa como de sus fan·ticos. Su website es www.danafuchs.com.

MARTIN LUTHER McCOY (Jo-Jo), guitarrista, cantante y compositor, realiza su debut como actor con el papel de Jo-Jo.

Bajo el nombre de Martin Luther, va a estrenar su prÛximo album, “Serial Thriller,” a principios de 2008. Mientras tanto, est· lanzando este otoÒo “Live from Arlene’s Grocery” exclusivamente en iTunes.

El album m·s reciente de Luther, “Rebel Soul Music,” fue estrenado en Septiembre 2004 con excelente crÌtica. Associated Press lo colocÛ cuarto entre los “Top Ten Albums” del 2004 y People Magazine lo galardono con elCritic’s Choice,” d·ndole al ·lbum 3.5 estrellas de un total de 4. Ha sido el primer artista independiente a quien se le otorgÛ el privilegio de grabar una sesiÛn para “MTV Live” en MTV.com. TambiÈn fue nombrado artista VH1.com “You Oughta Know” en dos ocasiones distintas. Su video musical por “Daily Bread” debuto en la cadena VH1 Soul y estuvo entre los primeros 10 videos m·s repetidos durante cuatro meses. “Rebel Soul Music” vendiÛ m·s de 20.000 copias en los Estados Unidos, y tambiÈn saliÛ a la venta en Europa y JapÛn.

Luther ha realizado m·s de 100 shows desde el lanzamiento del ·lbum, viajando con su banda a travÈs de Estados Unidos, Europa y JapÛn. Ha realizado tours como solista compartiendo cartel con Jill Scott y The Roots, y tambiÈn ha realizado shows con audiencias enormes como miembro de The Roots.

Como la leyenda por la que fue nombrado, Martin Luther creciÛ bajo un rÈgimen de himnos y reglas estrictas establecidas por sus estrictos y religiosos padres. En su adolescencia fue forzado a tomar las tradicionales lecciones de piano con el fin de que alg·n dÌa pudiera tocar en la iglesia. Expuesto a la sicodÈlica m·sica de Parliament Funkadelic de su hermano, lo llevÛ a encontrar su propia voz como artista. Continuando tocando el teclado, agregÛ a su arsenal musical los tambores y finalmente dominÛ su arma secreta –la guitarra.

El lanzamiento independiente del ·lbum de Luther, The Calling, desatÛ el interÈs de su seguidores y crÌticos en todo el mundo, por su viva lÌrica y fresca mezcla de rock y soul.

Su interpretaciÛn en “This Christmas” fue recientemente lanzada en el album Target’s 2005 Christmas. TambiÈn escribiÛ una canciÛn especial para O, The Oprah Magazine, que fue presentada en “The Oprah Winfrey Show.” Ha aparecido en “The Chris Rock Show” e interpretÛ junto a George Clinton & Parliament Funkadelic, Jill Scott, Eric Benet, y Cody Chestnutt, por nombrar sÛlo a algunos. TambiÈn brindÛ una interpretaciÛn inolvidable con Dave Matthews en el NAACP Image Awards.

Nativo de San Francisco, Martin Luther se graduÛ del Morehouse College, con un tÌtulo en Artes Medi·ticas y un concentraciÛn en Derecho de Entretenimiento y Mercadotecnia.

 

T.V. CARPIO (Prudence) naciÛ en Oklahoma pero creciÛ en Hong Kong con su madre, Teresa Carpio, quien era, y todavÌa es, un nombre muy conocido como cantante y conductora en Asia. En los primeros aÒos de la secundaria, su familia se trasladÛ nuevamente a los Estados Unidos, donde una promisoria carrera de patinadora sobre hielo en T.V. fue frenada por una fuerte lesiÛn. Luego de su graduaciÛn del secundario, ella aprendiÛ espaÒol antes de enrolarse en el programa de jazz en la Universidad de New School en la ciudad de New York.

Carpio apareciÛ como bailarina en videos musicales para Bruce Springsteen y Whitney Houston, entre otros, lo que la llevÛ a obtener pequeÒos papeles en las series de televisiÛn “Law & Order” y “The Jury.” Como soprano alta, ella cantÛ con la FilarmÛnica de Hong Kong en los aclamados conciertos de su madre, Diva, interpretando y cantando el papel de su madres cuando tenÌa 18 aÒos de edad.

DespuÈs, Carpio obtuvo el papel de Gail en el film de Spike Lee, She Hate Me, seguido del papel de Angela en Sucker Free City, tambiÈn de Lee para Showtime.

Actualmente vive en la ciudad de New York y acaba de finalizar un trabajo en “Rent” en Broadway.

 

SOBRE LOS REALIZADORES

El film m·s reciente de la directora de teatro, de cine y de opera, JULIE TAYMOR (Directora, Historia) es Frida protagonizada por Salma Hayek y Alfred Molina. El film obtuvo seis nominaciones para los OscarÆ, y ganÛ dos. Taymor realizÛ su debut como directora de cine en 1999 con Titus, protagonizado por Anthony Hopkins y Jessica Lange.† Basado en la obra de Shakespeare, “Titus Andronicus,” su guiÛn adaptado fue publicado en un libro ilustrado por Newmarket Press.

Taymor ha recibido numerosos premios por “The Lion King,” que fue estrenado en 1997 en el New Amsterdam Theater, y ganÛ dos Premios Tony a la mejor direcciÛn de un musical y por sus originales diseÒos de vestuario. Ella tambiÈn co-diseÒÛ las m·scaras y los tÌteres, y escribiÛ lÌrica adicional para “The Lion King,” que fue montado en nueve paÌses en todo el mundo. “The Lion King” m·s recientemente se estrenÛ en Sud·frica y ser· puesto en escena en Paris in Octubre 2007.

DirigiÛ la opera “The Magic Flute” que fue estrenada en el otoÒo de 2004, con la conducciÛn de James Levine, y que est· hoy en el repertorio del Metropolitan Opera.†

Taymor dirigiÛ “The Green Bird,” de Carlo Gozzi, en Broadway en 2000.† La obra fue por primera vez producida en 1996 en el Theatre For a New Audience, en The New Victory Theater y se presentÛ en La Jolla Playhouse.

La pieza original de Taymor, “Juan DariÈn: A Carnival Mass,” presentada en el Teatro Vivian Beaumont del Lincoln Center en 1996, recibiÛ cinco nominaciones para los Premios Tony, incluyendo al mejor director.† Originalmente producido por el Music Theater Group en 1988, “Juan DariÈn” fue dirigida y diseÒada por Taymor, y co-escrita con el compositor Elliot Goldenthal. La pieza ganÛ dos Premios Obies y numerosos otros premios, tambiÈn fue presentada en el Festival Internacional de Edinburgh, en los festivales de Francia, JerusalÈn y Montreal, y tuvo una extensa temporada en San Francisco.

En Septiembre de 1995, Taymor dirigiÛ “The Flying Dutchman” de Wagner para Los Angeles Music Center en una co-producciÛn con la Gran Opera de Houston. Ella dirigiÛ “Salome” de Strauss para la Opera Kirov en Rusia, Alemania, e Israel, bajo la batuta Valery Gergiev. En Junio de 1993, dirigiÛ “The Magic Flute” de Mozart para el Maggio Musicale en Florence, con la conducciÛn de Zubin Mehta.

La primer direcciÛn de una opera de Taymor fue “Oedipus Rex” de Stravinsky con la Orquesta Saito Kinen en JapÛn, bajo la batuta de Seiji Ozawa en 1992.† Los protagonistas de la opera fueron Philip Langridge como Oedipus y Jessye Norman como Jocasta.†La pelÌcula que se realizÛ sobre la representaciÛn operÌstica tuvo su premier en el Festival de Cine de Sundance y ganÛ el Premio del Jurado en el Festival de Cine de Montreal.† La pelÌcula fue emitida en televisiÛn internacionalmente en 1993, ganando un Premio Emmy y el Premio del International Classical Music a la mejor producciÛn de opera en 1994.

El primer film de Taymor, Fool’s Fire, que ella realizÛ la adaptaciÛn y lo dirigiÛ, est· basado en el cuento corto de Edgar Allan Poe, “Hop-Frog.” Producido por el American Playhouse, tuvo su premiere en el Festival de Cine de Sundance y saliÛ al aire en PBS en Marzo de 1992.† El film ganÛ el premio al "Mejor Drama" en el Festival Internacional de Cine ElectrÛnico en Tokio.

La producciÛn teatral de Taymor de “Titus Andronicus,” de Shakespeare, fue producida fuera de Broadway en el Theatre For a New Audience en 1994. Otros crÈditos en direcciÛn incluyen: “The Tempest” (TFANA en el Stratford American Shakespeare Festival), “The Taming of the Shrew,” “The Transposed Heads” (basado en la novela de Thomas Mann, co-producido por el American Musical Theater Festival y el Lincoln Center), y “Liberty’s Taken,” un musical original co-creado con David Suehsdorf y Elliot Goldenthal.

Mientras cursaba la beca Watson en Indonesia entre 1975-79, Taymor desarrollÛ una compaÒÌa de m·scaras y baile, Teatr Loh, con actores, m·sicos, bailarines y titiriteros de Java, de Bali, franceses, alemanes y americanos. La compaÒÌa viajÛ a travÈs de Indonesia con dos producciones originales, “Way of Snow” y “Tirai” (luego presentada en los Estados Unidos).

En 1991 Taymor recibiÛ a la beca MacArthur “genius”.† TambiÈn recibiÛ la beca Guggenheim, dos premios OBIE, el primer premio anual Dorothy B. Chandler Award in Theater, y en 1990 ganÛ el premio Brandeis Creative Arts. Un libro ilustrando su carrera, Julie Taymor: Playing with Fire, fue recientemente desarrollado y revisado por Harry N. Abrams.† Su libro, The Lion King: Pride Rock on Broadway, es publicado por Hyperion.† Un libro ilustrado, Frida: Bringing Frida Kahlo's Life and Art to Film, est· disponible en Newmarket Press. Una retrospectiva del trabajo de 25 aÒos de Taymor fue inaugurada en el otoÒo de 1999 en el Centro Wexner para las Artes en Ohio y luego fue presentada en el National Museum of Women in the Arts (Washington D.C.) y en el Field Museum (Chicago).

Recientemente Taymor colaborÛ con Goldenthal en una opera original, “Grendel,” que fue estrenada en la Opera de Los Angeles el 8 de junio de 2006 y luego en el Festival del Lincoln Center.

 

SUZANNE & JENNIFER TODD (Productores) co-fundaron su compaÒÌa de producciÛn Team Todd en 1997. Actualmente est·n establecidos en Sony Pictures Entertainment, asociados en un acuerdo de producciÛn con el productor Joe Roth. Juntos, ellos han producido m·s de una docena de pelÌculas tanto para cine como para televisiÛn, con gran Èxito comercial como de la crÌtica cinematogr·fica. Sus producciones incluyen los aclamados films Memento y Boiler Room, como asÌ tambiÈn tres de los Austin Powers, que juntos recaudaron m·s de medio billÛn de dÛlares en todo el mundo.

Suzanne y Jennifer ganaron el Independent Spirit Award a la mejor pelÌcula por Memento, que tambien le valiÛ a Christopher Nolan el premio al mejor guiÛn y mejor director. El film fue tambiÈn nominado como la PelÌcula del AÒo por AFI, y fue nominado para el OscarÆ y para los Globos de Oro por su guiÛn. Por el film para HBO “If These Walls Could Talk 2” los Todds ganaron una nominaciÛn para los Emmy por RealizaciÛn Sobresaliente en PelÌculas para TelevisiÛn, como asÌ tambiÈn una nominaciÛn para el premio ProducciÛn Televisiva del AÒo en Longform por Producers Guild of America.

Suzanne y Jennifer tambiÈn fueron premiados con el prestigioso Lucy Award del Women in Film, un premio entregado a mujeres que han ayudado a fortalecer el rol de la mujeres en la industria del entretenimiento.

Los crÈditos de los Todds incluyen: Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery, Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me, y Austin Powers in Goldmember, todos protagonizados por Mike Myers y dirigidos por Jay Roach. Los tres sensacionales films constituyeron una de las franquicias de comedia m·s exitosas de la historia del cine. Elos tambiÈn realizaron la producciÛn de Boiler Room, el drama de Wall Street protagonizado por Giovanni Ribisi y Ben Affleck, que fue nominado a la Mejor PelÌcula y al Mejor Primer GuiÛn por los Independent Spirit Awards, como asÌ tambiÈn las dos exitosas comedias rom·nticas: Must Love Dogs, con John Cusack y Diane Lane, y Prime, con Meryl Streep y Uma Thurman.

Adem·s de Across the Universe, Team Todd tambiÈn tienen el film Ira and Abby que ser· estrenado el 14 de septiembre de 2007. La ligeramente subversiva comedia rom·ntica fue dirigida por Robert Cary y es protagonizada por Chris Messina y Jennifer Westfeldt, con guiÛn realizado por Westfeldt. Ya ha ganado el premio a la mejor pelÌcula en el Festival de Artes de Comedia de HBO a comienzos de este aÒo y ser· estrenado por Magnolia Pictures.

Asimismo, los Todds est·n en la pos-producciÛn de The Accidental Husband, con Uma Thurman, Colin Firth, y Jeffrey Dean Morgan. El film se trata sobre una locutora de un programa de radio quien al intentar registrarse en el juzgado para casarse con el hombre al que est· comprometida descubre que ya est· casada con otro hombre. El film fue dirigido por Griffin Dunne, y ser· estrenado a principios de 2008 por Yari Film Group.

 

El nominado al OscarÆ, Matthew Gross (Productor), es presidente de la compaÒÌa de producciÛn de cine y televisiÛn, Gross Entertainment.

Desde 2003, Gross Entertainment ha tenido un exclusivo acuerdo de producciÛn de 5 aÒos con ABC Television Studios. Gross fue productor ejecutivo de aclamada y premiada serie de acciÛn del aÒo pasado “Day Break.” Actualmente est· en producciÛn de las nuevas series de televisiÛn de ABC “Dirty Sexy Money” protagonizadas por Peter Krause, Donald Sutherland, y Billy Baldwin. Gross est· tambiÈn en la pre-producciÛn de Fired Up!, una comedia adolscente que est· produciendo para Screen Gems con MAXIM magazine y Dennis Publishing.

Gross es el ex presidente de producciÛn de Kopelson Entertainment donde Èl realizÛ la producciÛn de Joe Somebody con Tim Allen. Durante la gesitÛn de Gross en Kopelson, la compaÒÌa realizÛ la producciÛn de Devil’s Advocate, A Perfect Murder, U.S. Marshals, Mad City, Murder at 1600, Don’t Say a Word, y Twisted. Las responsabilidades de Gross incluyen la supervisiÛn y el desarrollo de todas las pelÌculas, como asÌ tambiÈn la gerencia y la administraciÛn de un staff de 25 empleados.

Adem·s, Gross fue presidente de Kopelson Telemedia, una compaÒÌa que Èl ayudÛ a crear. Kopelson Telemedia realizÛ la producciÛn ejecutiva de las series “The Fugitive” con Tim Daly para CBS, y de “Thieves” con John Stamos para ABC.

Antes de trabajar en Kopelson Entertainment, Matthew fue vicepresidente de desarrollo de Wilshire Court Productions, una divisiÛn de Paramount Television Group donde Èl supervisÛ el desarrollo y la produccion de 65 films.

Gross su carrera en la industria del entretenimiento como actor mientras asistÌa a la UCLA donde concentraba sus estudios en economÌa, pero pronto se dio cuenta que su vocaciÛn era la realizaciÛn de pelÌculas. Trabajando como asistente de producciÛn y como coordinador de asistente de producciÛn, Gross luego asistiÛ al American Film Institute, donde obtuvo una maestrÌa en realizaciÛn de cinematogr·fica. En el AFI, realizÛ la producciÛn de cinco cortometrajes y dirigiÛ un documental para el Cedars Sinai Medical Center. Como joven productor, Gross fue nominado para los Premios de la AcademiaÆ en la categorÌa de Mejor Cortometraje de AcciÛn Real por su film Bronx Cheers.

Gross naciÛ y creciÛ en Los Angeles, donde contin·a residiendo junto a su esposa y sus tres hijos.

 

DEREK DAUCHY (Productor Ejecutivo), es parte del grupo creativo de Revolution Studios, y ha ayudado a desarrollar y supervisar pelÌculas como Are We Done Yet?, The Benchwarmers, XXX franchise, Anger Management, Daddy Day Care, Radio, The Animal, y Darkness Falls (que Èl tambiÈn realizÛ la produccion ejecutiva). Recientemente supervisÛ y realizÛ la producciÛn ejecutiva de The Fog, XXX: State of the Union, Are We There Yet?, and Man of the House. Con anterioridad Dauchy estuvo tres aÒos trabajando para Barry Levinson y Paula Weinstein en Baltimore/Spring Creek Pictures, donde ayudÛ a desarrollar pelÌculas taquilleras como The Perfect Storm y Analyze This.

 

RUDD SIMMONS (Productor Ejecutivo) con anterioridad trabajÛ como productor ejecutivo de The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou, The Royal Tenenbaums, y The Hi-Lo Country. TambiÈn realizÛ la producciÛn de pelÌculas como Dead Man Walking y High Fidelity, como asÌ tambiÈn un segmento del film de Jim Jarmusch, Coffee and Cigarettes. Un viejo colaborador de Jarmusch, los crÈditos de Simmon incluyen Night on Earth, Mystery Train, y Down by Law.

 

CHARLES NEWIRTH (Productor Ejecutivo) se uniÛ a Revolution Studios en Mayo 2000, y es el responsable de la producciÛn fÌsica de todas las pelÌculas de Revolution Studios. Revolution Studios, que actualmente est· en su sÈptimo aÒo de operaciones ha estrenado 40 pelÌculas, incluyendo America’s Sweethearts, Black Hawk Down, xXx, Anger Management, Daddy Day Care, Hellboy, 13 Going On 30, Click, Are We There Yet? y Rocky Balboa. En Revolution Studios, Newirth trabajÛ como productor ejecutivo de Maid in Manhattan, The One, America’s Sweethearts, Christmas with the Kranks, Freedomland, y Perfect Stranger.

Antes de unirse a Revolution Studios, Newirth produjo en 1999 el exitoso Galaxy Quest. TambiÈn realizÛ la producciÛn del popular Èxito de Robin Williams Patch Adams y Home Fries con Drew Barrymore.

Otros crÈditos de Newirth como productor ejecutivo incluyen el film de Brad Silberling, City of Angels, protagonizado por Nicolas Cage y Meg Ryan; el drama real de Rob Reiner Ghosts of Mississippi con Alec Baldwin, Whoopi Goldberg, y James Woods; The American President, tambiÈn para el director Rob Reiner, con Michael Douglas y Annette Bening; y el film de Jon Turteltaub Phenomenon con John Travolta. Adem·s, Newirth co-produjo el taquillero Èxito de Robert Zemeckis, Forrest Gump,ganador del Premio de la Academia. TambiÈn trabajÛ como co-productor de los films de Barry Levinson Toys y Bugsy, y fue asistente de producciÛn de Levinson en el film Avalon.

Nativo de New Yorker, Newirth irrumpiÛ en el industria del cine como gerente de locaciÛn en pelÌculas tales como Flashdance, Pretty in Pink, y Ferris Bueller’s Day Off. M·s tarde se introdujo a la gerencia de producciÛn en Throw Momma From the Train y RoboCop antes de lograr su primer crÈdito en producciÛn como productor asociado en el film de Andrew Davis, The Package.

 

Bruno Delbonnel, A.F.C. (Director de FotografÌa) recibiÛ nominaciones para los Premios de la Academia, para el premio ASC, y para los Premios Cesar a la mejor cinematografÌa por su trabajo en el film A Very Long Engagement en 2004.

Por su anterior colaboraciÛn con el director Jean-Pierre Jeunet, AmÈlie, recibiÛ nominaciones para los Premios de la Academia, para la BAFTA, para ASC y el premio del European Film al Mejor CinematÛgrafo.

Volver· a trabajar con Jeunet en la prÛxima adaptaciÛn de la premiada novela que fue un best-seller, Life of Pi. TambiÈn realizar· la fotografÌa de Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince para el director David Yates.

Recientemente Delbonnel realizÛ la fotografÌa de Infamous, sobre la vida de Truman Capote, dirigida por Douglas McGrath. FotografiÛ The Cat’s Meow para el director Peter Bogdanovich, estrenado en 2001.

Sus crÈditos en el cine francÈs incluyen: Ni Pour, Ni Contre, Marie, Nonna, La Vierge et Moi, C’est Jamais Loin y Tout Le Monde N’a Pas Eu La Chance D’Avoir Des Parents Communistes. Delbonnel tambiÈn ha filmado muchos comerciales incluyendo uno para la PBS (“Bucket Brigade”) por el que fue nominado para el premio AICP a la Mejor CinematografÌa en 2005.

 

Originalmente un estudiante de bellas artes, el nativo de Manhattan MARK FRIEDBERG (DiseÒo de ProducciÛn) uniÛ sus pasiones tanto para el cine como para la pintura al ser DiseÒador de ProducciÛn en una serie de pelÌculas de bajo presupuesto que fueron producidas durante el movimiento de cine independiente a principios de los ¥90.

Anteriores trabajos de Friedberg en pequeÒos pero valiosos esfuerzos como en el film de Alexandre Rockwell, In the Soup, y en la pelÌcula de Maggie Greenwald, The Ballad of Little Jo, le valieron gran atenciÛn y lo llevaron a colaborar con numerosos y destacados realizadores desde Garry Marshall (Runaway Bride) y Mel Brooks (The Producers, 2005) hasta los independientes Mira Nair (Kama Sutra: A Tale of Love), Ang Lee (The Ice Storm), Ed Harris (Pollock), Todd Haynes (Far from Heaven), y Jim Jarmusch (Broken Flowers).

Otros proyectos ya finalizados pero a·n no estrenados incluyen los films: Synecdoche de Charlie Kaufman, New York, que ya completÛ la fotografÌa principal, y The Darjeeling Limited, sobre el viaje en tren de tres hermanos a travÈs del sub-continente Indio, para el director Wes Anderson (con quien Friedberg trabajÛ previamente en The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou).

Es la tercera colaboraciÛn de Fran«oise Bonnot, A.C.E. (Editor) con la directora Julie Taymor: ella tambiÈn editÛ Frida y Titus.

Para Bonnot, el cine es parte de su familia. Cuando ella nacÌa, su madre, Monique Bonnot, era una conocida editora de cine que trabajaba con el legendario Jean-Pierre Melville. Una vez que creciÛ, Bonnot tambiÈn se convirtiÛ en editora y su hermano Alain se convirtiÛ en director de cine. Francoise Bonnot se casÛ con el famoso director de cine francÈs Henri Verneuil y el hijo de ambos, Patrick Malakian, siguiÛ con la tradiciÛn familiar y se convirtiÛ en director de cine.

Bonnot se convirtiÛ en colaborada de Costa Gavras y recibiÛ un Premio de la Academia a la Mejor EdiciÛn en Cine en 1969 por Z y recibiÛ el premio de la British Academy por Missing en 1982. Ella re-editÛ el film de Jean-Jacques Annaud, Black and White in Color, que ganÛ el Premio de la Academia a la Mejor PelÌcula Extranjera en 1976. Fue nominada para los premios Eddie en 1994 por el film de John Frankenheimer, The Burning Season, y ha sido nominada en numerosas ocasiones para el premio French Best Editing Cesar (Le PassÈ Simple de Michel Drach, Hanna K de Costa Gavras y Place VendÙme de Nicole Garcia ).

Durante su carrera, ella trabajÛ con otros grandes directores, incluyendo Roman Polanski en The Tenant que recibiÛ la Palma de Oro en el Festival de Cine de Cannes en 1976, Volker Schlondorf (Swann in Love), Jean-Pierre Melville (L’ArmÈe des Ombres), Michael Cimino (Year of the Dragon, The Sicilian) y Roland Joffe (Fat Man and Little Boy).

 

ALBERT WOLSKY (DiseÒo de Vestuario) m·s recientemente finalizÛ su trabajo con el director Robert Towne para el film, Ask the Dust, protagonizado por Colin Farrell y Salma Hayek. TambiÈn trabajÛ en la reciente remake de The Manchurian Candidate para el director Jonathan Demme.

Dos veces ganador del Premio de la Academia por sus diseÒos en los films de Bob Fosse, All that Jazz, y de Barry Levinson, Bugsy, Wolsky tambiÈn ha sido nominado para el Oscar por Toys de Levinson, el film de aventura The Journey of Natty Gann, y el drama de Alan Pakula, Sophie’s Choice.

Wolsky naciÛ en Paris, Francia, en 1930. Se graduÛ del City College de New York y comenzÛ a trabajar en la industria de viajes antes de dedicarse al trabajo de su vida, el diseÒo de vestuariio, a los 30 aÒos de edad. TrabajÛ como asistente de la leyenda del diseÒo de vestuario Helene Pons en la producciÛn original de Broadway de “Camelot.”

Wolsky ganÛ su primer crÈdito en cine como diseÒador de vestruario por The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter. En 1999, fue galardonado con el premio Costume Designers Guild Lifetime Achievement Award.

Entre las peliculas m·s recientes para los que diseÒÛ el vestuario se pueden mencionar: Road to Perdition de Sam Mendes por el que el Costume Designers Guild lo galardonÛ con una nominaciÛn a la Excelencia en DiseÒo de Vestuario, la comedia de Jennifer Lopez Maid in Manhattan, y la comdedia de ciencia ficciÛn Galaxy Quest, que le valiÛ una nominaciÛn para un premio Saturn Award. Otras pelÌculas en las que Wolsky ha realizado el diseÒo de vestuario incluyen: Runaway Bride, You’ve Got Mail, The Jackal, Red Corner, Striptease, Up Close & Personal, The Pelican Brief, Fatal Instinct, Enemies: A Love Story, Cookie, Crimes of the Heart, Legal Eagles, Down and Out in Beverly Hills, The Falcon and the Snowman, Moscow on the Hudson, To Be or Not to Be, Star 80, Tempest, The Jazz Singer, Manhattan, Grease, An Unmarried Woman, The Turning Point, Lenny, The Gambler, Harry and Tonto, Up the Sandbox, The Trial of the Cantonsville Nine, Little Murders, Lovers and Other Strangers, Where’s Poppa? y Popi. Para televisiÛn, Wolsky creÛ en 1976 el vestuario para el especial de la NBC “Beauty and the Beast,” protagonizado por George C. Scott y Trish Van Devere, que le valiÛ un premio Emmy.

 

El compositor Elliot Goldenthal creÛ trabajos para orquesta, teatro, opera, ballet y cine. En 2003, fue galardonado con el Premio de la Academia y por el Globo de Oro a la Mejor M·sica Original por su brillante trabajo en el film de Miramax, Frida, con Salma Hayek y Alfred Molina, dirigido por Julie Taymor. Un doblemente nominado al Oscar ese aÒo, Goldenthal tambiÈn recibiÛ una nominaciÛn al Oscar a la Mejor CanciÛn Original (“Burn it Blue” interpretada por Casteno Veluso) y la m·sica fue lanzada por Decca/UMG Label y estuvo en el Billboard’s World Music Chart y en los Latin charts por m·s de 40 semanas.

Goldenthal tambiÈn ha recibido dos nominaciones para los Oscar y dos para los Globos de Oro por su m·sica para Interview With The Vampire (1994) y para Michael Collins (1996); nominaciones para los Grammy por A Time To Kill (1996) y Batman Forever (1995); y tres nominaciones del Chicago Film Critics Award por Heat (1995), Michael Collins (1997) y The Butcher Boy (1997). En 1998, Goldenthal ganÛ el prestigioso premio de L.A. Film Critics a la Mejor M·sica Original por su sobresaliente trabajo en el film de Neil Jordan, The Butcher Boy.

Para conciertos, sus trabajos incluyen la extensa pieza para orquesta, Fire Water Paper, un Oratorio de Vietnam encargado por la Orquesta SinfÛnica del PacÌfico, creada por el 20_ aniversario de la Guerra de Vietnam, que se estrenÛ en California y luego fue representada por la Orquesta SinfÛnica de Boston, con Seiji Ozawa que obtuvo una aclamada crÌtica y fue representada tambiÈn en el Carnegie Hall y en el Kennedy Center. Sony Classical Records lanzÛ el album en 1996, con Yo-Yo Ma como principal solista.

En 1995, Goldenthal fue encargado por el American Ballet Theater para crear un nuevo ballet en tres actos de “Othello,” que se estrenÛ en el Metropolitan Opera en Mayo de 1997. “Othello” fue co-producido por ABT en sociedad con el Ballet de San Francisco, con la coreografÌa de destacado, Lar Lubovitch. La espectacular producciÛn captÛ la Èpica emociÛn y el profundo drama de la gran tragedia de Shakespearian, con un elenco que incluyÛ a la estrella de ballet Desmond Richardson, como asÌ tambiÈn a Jose Manuel Carreno, Julie Kent, Susan Jaffe y Sandra Brown, y fue uno de los grandes acontecimientos de la temporada de ballet de 1997. En Junio de 2003, las prestigiosas series de PBS “Great Performances” emitieron un especial de dos horas de duraciÛn de “Othello” filmado con el Ballet de San Francisco con la m·sica original de Goldenthal.

En 2006, la opera original en 3 actos de Goldenthal, “Grendel,” basada en parte en el antiguo poema Èpico inglÈs “Beowulf” y dirigida por Julie Taymor, se estrenÛ en la Opera de Los Angeles, convirtiÈndose en una de las producciones m·s exitosas en su historia. Tuvo su debut en la costa este como la pieza central del Festiva del Lincoln Center en New York, y fue incorporada al repertorio permanente de la Opera de Los Angeles. Goldenthal fue recientemente nombrado uno de los dos finalistas para los Premios Pulizter 2006 en m·sica por su trabajo en esta opera.

Otros trabajos cl·sicos encargados a Goldenthal incluyen una pieza para la celebraciÛn de los 70 aÒos de Leonard Bernstein. La Orquesta FilarmÛnica de Brooklyn interpretÛ su pieza, Shadow Play Scherzo, en el Town Hall en New York y m·s tarde ese aÒo (1988), su trabajo Pastime Variations, encargado por la Orquesta de C·mara de Haydn-Mozart en honor al 75_ Aniversario de Of Ebbets Field fue interpretada en la Acadmia de M·sica de Brooklyn.

Ha compuesto m·sica para m·s de una docena de producciones teatrales incluyendo “Juan Darien: A Carnival Mass” (1988), basada en el cuento de Horacio Quiroga, una nueva versiÛn de “Juan Darien” que abriÛ la temporada en el Vivian Beaumont Theater en el Lincoln Center en 1996, obteniendo una aclamada crÌtica, como asi tambiÈn cuatro nominaciones para el Drama Desk y cinco nominaciones para los Tony, incluyendo Mejor Musical y Mejor M·sica Original.

Otros crÈditos de Goldenthal en teatro incluyen el musical “The Transposed Heads,” basado en la novela de Thomas Mann, presentado en el Lincoln Center y en el American Music Theater Festival in Philadelphia; “The King Stag,” en el American Repertory Theater; el musical “Liberty’s Taken,” producido por el Festival de Castle Hill y su ·ltima colaboraciÛn con Taymor, la aclamada producciÛn de Broadway de la historieta de Carlo Gozzi, “The Green Bird,” que se estrenÛ en el Theatre For A New Audience en 1995 y tambiÈn fue presentada en La Jolla Playhouse en 1996. El disco fue distribuido por DRG. Goldenthal tambiÈn ha compuesto la m·sica para las obras de teatro de Shakespeare’s “The Tempest,” “The Taming of the Shrew,” “Titus Andronicus,” y “A Midsummer’s Night Dream.”

DiscÌpulo de Aaron Copland y de John Corigliano, Goldenthal obtuvo su diploma en la preparatoria y maestrÌa en composiciÛn musical en la Escuela de M·sica de Manhattan. Ha escrito mucho para orquesta, como asÌ tambiÈn para composiciones de c·mara y vocales y es publicada por G. Schirmer. Sus otros premios incluyen el premio Arturo Toscanini, el premio del New Music for Young Ensembles, el premio Stephen Sondheim en M·sica para Teatro y el New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowship.

Adem·s de todo lo anteriormente mencionado, otros crÈditos en m·sica para cine de Goldenthal incluyen el film de Neil Jordan, In Dreams, con Annette Bening y Robert Downey Jr.; la pelÌcula de Barry Levinson Sphere; Batman & Robin dirigido por Joel Schumacher; Alien 3; Cobb, con Tommy Lee Jones; el film de Gus Van Sant, Drugstore Cowboy; Fool’s Fire; la versiÛn de Julie Taymor de Titus, con Anthony Hopkins y Jessica Lange; y The Good Thief, con Nick Nolte, que marcÛ su quinta colaboraciÛn con el director Neil Jordan.

 

El ·ltimo trabajo de DANIEL EZRALOW (coreÛgrafo) puede ser visto en el actual exitoso show de Cirque du Soleil, “Love,” como asÌ tambiÈn en el propio show Dance Theatre de Ezralow, “Why,” que se estrenÛ con excelente crÌtica en Mil·n, Italia, en la primavera, 2007. El show de Ezralow, “Aeros,” creado con el equipo de Gimnasia OlÌmpica de Roma, contin·a su exitoso tour en todo el mundo, mientras que su quinto nuevo trabajo con el reconocido Hubbard Street Dance Chicago se estrenÛ en el Symphony Hall Chicago con la Orquesta SinfÛnica de Chicago.

 

Ezralow comenzÛ su carrera como bailarÌn con 5X2 Plus, Lar Lubovitch, Paul Taylor y Pilobolus. Fue uno de los originales bailarÌn-coreÛgrafo en crear MOMIX y es un miembro fundador de ISO Dance. TambiÈn ha creado trabajos originales para numerosas compaÒÌas de danza prestigiosas en todo el mundo, incluyendo el Opera Ballet de Paris, el Hubbard Street Dance Chicago, la London Contemporary Dance Company, y Batsheva, por nombrar sÛlo algunas. Su trabajo con ISO Dance y su show multi-media “Mandala” han viajado por todo el mundo con excelente crÌticas y con entradas agotadas.

Trabajando intensamente en cine y televisiÛn, Ezralow ha realizado la coreografÌa para directores tales como Julie Taymor, Ron Howard, Lina Wertmuller, Marco Belocchio, Nakano Hiroyuki, Dominique Sena, y Julian Temple. Ha creado el premiado especial de danza “Windows,” presentado en Bravo, y recibiÛ un Emmy por su trabajo en el especial “Episodes” de PBS.

En teatro, ha realizado la coreografÌa de la producciÛn de Julie Taymor en Broadway “The Green Bird,” y tambiÈn la de “Flying Dutchman" para las operas de Los Angeles y Houston. Ha realizado la coreografÌa y la direcciÛn asociada de la nueva producciÛn musical contempor·nea “Tosca: Amore Disperato,” que se estrenÛ y se presentÛ durante largo tiempo en Italia, incluyendo en el Arena de Verona. TambiÈn ha realizado la coreografÌa la producciÛn de Maggio Musicale de "Aida" con la direcciÛn de Zubin Mehta, asimismo dirigiÛ y realizÛ la coreografÌa de "The Adventures of Emilio Salgari" en la FilarmÛnica de Verona, y creÛ la coreografÌa, el movimiento escÈncio y apareciÛn con Vittorio Gassman en la adaptaciÛn de Melville de "Moby Dick" en Theatre Champs Elysees.

En el mundo de la m·sica, ha creado la coreografÌa y shows para teatro para artistas tales como Josh Groban, Faith Hill, Andrea Bocelli, U2, David Bowie, Sting, Pat Metheny, Lucio Dalla, Ricky Martin, y muchos m·s.

Ezralow ha ganado numerosos premios como el premio Innovador del American Choreography, el premio a la CoreografÌa Sobresaliente en un Especial de TelevisiÛn tambiÈn entregado por el American Choreography, una nominaciÛn para los Emmy, un premio Positano por Excelencia en CoreografÌa, y un Premio Nijinsky, sin mencionar otras nominaciones por coreografÌas sobresalientes en eventos especiales, por programas en vivo, operas, videos de rock, comerciales, cine, y programas de televisiÛn en todo el mundo. TambiÈn ha ganado la beca de NEA Fellowship Grant.

La visiÛn coreogr·fica de Ezralow y su actuaciÛn tambiÈn han sido vistas en innovativas campaÒas comerciales para Gap Clothing, Danone Yogurt, New York Times Men's Fashion, Issey Miyake, Ermengilda Zegna, Hugo Boss, Xerox-Fuji, Ilford Film, Eveready Battery, Sapporo Beer, y los relojes Raymond-Weil.

Su imagen y sus movimientos ilustran las tapas y las hojas de los famosos libros de fotografÌa de danza The Fugitive Gesture y Breaking Bounds. Es el tema de un documental llamado The Journey of a Dancer: Daniel Ezralow, que explora en profundidad el proceso creativo de Ezralow, su vida y su trabajo.

 

Nacido y criado entre la m·sica cl·sica en Winterthur, Suiza, Matthias “Teese” Gohl (Productor de Canciones, Supervisor de ProducciÛn de M·sica) estudiÛ composiciÛn de jazz en el Berklee College en Boston, MA. DespuÈs de aÒos de componer y viajar con grupos de jazz locales, se inclinÛ por la M·sica para Teatro y DiseÒo de M·sica. Ha trabajado en el American Repertory Theater de Cambridge, MA, en la New York University, en el Trinity Repertory Theater en Providence, R.I., y en el Theater For A New Audience en NY. Sus colaboraciones en teatro incluyen a Elliot Goldenthal, Anne Bogart, Oscar Eustis, Bill Alexander, Tina Landau, Brian Jucha y Andre Serban.

Mientras estuvo en Cambridge colaborÛ con Elliot Goldenthal en la m·sica para Pet Semetary y desde entonces ha producido m·s de sus veinte m·sicas de pelÌculas incluyendo: Interview with the Vampire, Michael Collins, two Batman features, Titus, y la m·sica ganadora del Oscar para el film de Julie Taymor, Frida. Otras famosas m·sicas de pelÌculas que Èl ha producido incluyen: la m·sica ganadora del Oscar de la pelÌcula The Red Violin de John Corigliano, y la m·sica del film de Barrington Phelong, Hillary & Jackie.

Como compositor de documentales, ha trabajado con Ken Burns y con PBS en "The West", "Frank Lloyd Wright" y "Jazz", con Roger Sherman en "Alexander Calder" y "The Sweetest Sound", y para Stephen Ives en el reciente film “New Orleans”, y con Michael Kantor para las series premiadas por el Emmy, “Broadway”.

Teese trabaja como director musical para Carly Simon, le realiza los arreglos musicales a Dave Stewart y otros roqueros, y est· esperando su trabajo como supervisor musical en la prÛxima producciÛn de Broadway de Julie Taymor de “Spider-Man: the Opera,” con m·sica de Bono & the Edge.

 

Ecritor, intÈrprete y productor musical, T BONE BURNETT (Productor de Canciones) hijo de Joseph Henry Burnett, naciÛ el 14 de Enero de 1948 en St. Louis, Missouri. CreciÛ en Fort Worth, Texas, donde comenzÛ a realizar grabaciones en 1965, produciendo para las bandas de Texas blues, country, y rock and roll, y ocasionalmente para Èl. Actualmente vive y trabaja en Los Angeles como productor y artista de grabaciÛn.

En 1975, realizÛ el tour con los Rolling Thunder Review de Bob Dylan antes de formar su propio grupo, el Alpha Band, con otros del tour. Burnett volviÛ a grabar como solista a fines de los ¥70 y ha continuado grabando numerosos y aclamados albums – incluyendo el nominado en 1992 para los Grammy “The Criminal Under My Own Hat” – bajo su propio nombre. Su ·lbum m·s reciente es The True False Identity de 2006, su primer ·lbum de nuevas canciones originales en 14 aÒos. Burnett tambiÈn lanzÛ el aÒo pasado “Twenty Twenty – The Essential T Bone Burnett,” una retrospectiva de 40 canciones que abarcan toda su carrera de m·sico.

En los ·ltimos nueve aÒos, ha escrito la m·sica para dos obras de Sam Shepard – Tooth of Crime (Second Dance) y The Late Henry Moss – y en 2005 compuso la m·sica para la producciÛn de Bertolt Brecht, Mother Courage and Her Children, con la CompaÒÌa de Teatro Steppenwolf de Chicago.

Un productor prolÌfico y vers·til, T Bone Burnett ha producido grabaciones de gran Èxito para Sam Phillips, Elvis Costello, Roy Orbison, Counting Crows, los Wallflowers y Gillian Welch, entre otros. Fue director musical para el film Roy Orbison and Friends: Black and White Night, con Orbison y la banda de Bruce Springsteen, Elvis Costello, Tom Waits, Bonnie Raitt, Burnett, entre muchos otros.

Recientemente Burnett ganÛ un Grammy por su trabajo en la banda de sonido del exitoso film Walk the Line, para el que tambiÈn compuso la m·sica original. Burnett ganÛ cuatro Grammys, incluyendo al Productor del AÒo, por el film de los hermanos Coen, O Brother, Where Art Thou? y su documental Down From the Mountain; tambiÈn ganÛ un Grammy por su trabajo en producir el ·lbum de Tony Bennett y k.d. “A Wonderful World.” RecibiÛ una nominaciÛn para el Oscar a la Mejor CanciÛn Original (con Elvis Costello) por “Scarlet Tide,” interpretada por Allison Krauss, de la aclamada banda de sonido que Èl produjo para Cold Mountain, dirigida por Anthony Minghella. RealizÛ la m·sica y escribiÛ tres canciones para el film de Wim Wenders, Don't Come Knockin’. M·s recientemente colaborÛ con Elvis Costello en el film de Steve Zaillian, All The King’s Men.

En 2002, Burnett uniÛ fuerzas con los hermanos Joel y Ethan Coen, ganadores del Premio de la Academia, para formar DMZ Records, y formÛ un joint venture con Columbia Records, y produjo el estreno inaugural: un nuevo ·lbum del legendario m·sico Ralph Stanley y la banda de sonido de Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood . Desde entonces DMZ ha lanzado varios aclamados ·lbum de bandas de sonido, y Burnett ha producido o realizado la producciÛn ejecutiva de varios films: Cold Mountain, A Mighty Wind, Crossing Jordan y The Ladykillers (2004), que volviÛ a reunir a Burnett con los hermanos Coen por primera vez desde O Brother, Where Art Thou? Burnett tambiÈn trabajÛ como productor ejecutivo del aclamado album de Ollabelle, distribuido por DMZ/Columbia Records en Marzo 2004. RealizÛ la producciÛn el debut del album “Future Perfect” de la banda experimental Autolux por DMZ/Columbia, que fue estrenado en October 2004, como asÌ tambiÈn el nuevo album de Cassandra Wilson, “Thunderbird,” que estrenado en Marzo, 2006. RealizÛ la producciÛn del prÛximo proyecto, “Raising Sand,” de Robert Plant y Alison Krauss, y actualmente est· trabajando en albums con John Mellencamp y la leyenda de blues B.B. King.

 

“ACADEMY AWARDÆ” y “OSCARÆ” son marcas registradas y de servicio de la Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Directed by

Julie Taymor

Screenplay by

Dick Clement & Ian La Frenais

Story by

Julie Taymor & Dick Clement & Ian La Frenais

Produced by

Suzanne Todd

Jennifer Todd

Produced by

Matthew Gross

Executive Producers

Derek Dauchy

Rudd Simmons

Charles Newirth

Director of Photography

Bruno Delbonnel, A.F.C.

Production Designer

Mark Friedberg

Editor

FranÁoise Bonnot, A.C.E.

Costume Designer

Albert Wolsky

Songs Written by

John Lennon and Paul McCartney

and by George Harrison

“Flying” by John Lennon, Paul McCartney,

George Harrison and Ringo Starr

Songs Produced by

T Bone Burnett

Elliot Goldenthal

Teese Gohl

Original Score by

Elliot Goldenthal

Evan Rachel Wood

Jim Sturgess

Joe Anderson

Dana Fuchs

Martin Luther McCoy

T. V. Carpio

Casting by

Bernard Telsey, CSA

Choreography by

Daniel Ezralow

Visual Effects Supervisor

Peter Crossman

Animation Sequences

Kyle Cooper

Music Supervisor

Denise Luiso

Co-Producers

Richard Baratta

Ben Haber

a Matthew Gross / Team Todd Production

A Revolution Studios Presentation

A Film by Julie Taymor

Unit Production Manager Richard Baratta

Unit Production Manager Pamela Thur-Weir

First Assistant Director Geoff Hansen

Second Assistant Director Danielle Rigby

Cast

Lucy Evan Rachel Wood

Jude Jim Sturgess

Max Carrigan Joe Anderson

Sadie Dana Fuchs

Jo-Jo Martin Luther McCoy

Prudence T.V. Carpio

Daniel Spencer Liff

Jude’s Liverpool Girlfriend Lisa Hogg

Cyril Nicholas Lumley

Phil Michael Ryan

Jude’s Mother Angela Mounsey

Cheer Coach Erin Elliott

Jude’s Father Robert Clohessy

Dorm Buddies Christopher Tierney

Curtis Holbrook

John Jeffrey Martin

Matt Caplan

Jock T.R. Boyce, Jr.

Tavern Waitresses Aisha De Haas

Leah Hocking

Old Guy at Tavern Bill Buell

Lucy’s Sister Ellen Hornberger

Emily Amanda Cole

High School Girlfriend Danya Taymor

Lucy’s Father Dylan Baker

Lucy’s Mother Linda Emond

Grandmother Carrigan Lynn Cohen

Uncle Teddy Bill Irwin

Daniel’s Mother Jennifer Van Dyck

Jo-Jo’s Brother Timothy T. Mitchum

Gospel Singer Carol Woods

Jo-Jo’s Mother Elain Graham

Hookers Orfeh

Antonique Smith

Tracy Nicole Chapman

Yassmin Alers

Deidre Goodwin

Bum/Pimp/Mad Hippie Joe Cocker

Rap Magazine Employees Jacob Pitts

Staceyanne Chin

Dani Jeanine Serralles

Katz’s Waiter Leonard Tucker

Cop at Wharf Warehouse Daniel Stewart Sherman

Army Sergeant Harry Lennix

Paco Logan Marshall-Green

Sadie’s Manager James Urbaniak

SDR Worker Kathleen Early

Luna Park Ching Valdes-Aran

Dr. Robert Bono

Mother Superior Daniel Ezralow

Max’s Girls Kiva Dawson

Halley Wegryn Gross

Pranksters Luther Creek

Jerzy Gwiazdowski

Arabella Holzbog

Ambrose Martos

Peter Mui

Karine Plantadit

Dan Weltner

Christopher Youngsman

Mr. Kite Eddie Izzard

Rita Ekaterina Sknarina

Fillmore Manager Tracy Westmoreland

Black Panther Ron Cephas Jones

Precinct House Sergeant W. W. Wilson III

Singing Nurse Salma Hayek

Tramp Drumming on Bin Lids Luke Cresswell

Bartender at Max’s Bar Jarlath Conroy

Sadie’s Singers Mandy Gonzales

Destan Owens

Cicily Daniels

Saycon Sengbloh

Sergeants on Rooftop Sam Kitchin

Chris McGarry

Door Officer at Strawberry Records Frank Hopf

As Himself Cousin Brucie Morrow

High School Girlfriends Navarra Novy-Williams

Sarah Jayne Jensen

Michelle Lookadoo

High School Dance Band Geoffrey Countryman

Julien Joy

Conrad Korsch

Brian McKenna

Jack Petricelli

Sadie’s Band Timothy Keiper

Arthur Lewis

Mark Lewis

Bryan Noll

Circus Band Michael Arenella

Cyro Baptista

Frank Fighera

Ritt Henn

Mark Stewart

Bruce Williamson

Sadie’s Rooftop Band Charles Drayton

Thomas Grasso

Joey Sykes

Paul Wallfisch

Gospel Choir

Caryn Allen Ronald Blackman

Erik Justin Gaines Marlene Mason

Tanisha Mason Cheryl McClurkin

Donald A. McClurkin, Sr. Lorna McClurkin

Olivia McClurkin Terrell Middleton

Jada Scott Murl Smith

Jor-El Wharton Devin Wharwood

Alyssa Woodside Christina Woodside

Dancers

Marcus Bellamy Tim Acito

Andrew Asnes Kevin Aubin

Collin Baja Michael Balderama

Charissa Barton Nicole Berger

Adolpho Blaire Brian Brooks

Enrique Brown Shawn Burgess

Ian Carney Sandy Chase

Ron De Jesus Jean Emile

Billy Fagen Angelo Fraboni

Kathryn Fraggos Kurt Froman

Bob Gaynor Chris Ghelfi

Tyler Gilstrap Greg Graham

Cody Green Matthew Hamel

Sean Martin Hingston Ryan Holly

Dell Howlett Terace Jones

Dominique Kelley Ryan Kelly

Mari Koda Jason Lacayo

Abdul Latif Marty Lawson

Yasmine C. Lee Brian Letendr

Tiger Martina Tim McGarrigal

Allie Meixner Dario Mejia

Angel Morales Matthew Neff

Leah O’Donnell Rika Okamoto

Patrick O’Neill Adesola Osakalumi

Danny Paschall Nathan Peck

Giovanni Perez Bobby Pestka

Kyle Pleasant Avery Ragsdale

Desmond S. Richardson Samuel Roberts

Alberto Dister Rondon Natsumi Sakurai

Luis Salgado Martin Samuel

Marcos Santana John Selya

Ying-Ying Shiau Todd Michel Smith

Jonah Spear Jordan Spencer

Matthew Steffens Dennis Stowe

Stacey Sund Christopher W. Tierney

Lara Tinari Michael Tracy

Andrew Turteltaub Nicole Wolcott

Wenshuan Yang Kenneth Ziegler

Stunt Coordinator George Aguilar

Co-Stunt Coordinator Stephen Pope

Marine Coordinator Chris Barnes

Stunts

Bobby Beckles

Nicole Callender

Liisa Cohen

Jeffrey Lee Gibsun

Tina McKissick

Judi Lewis Ockler

Derrick Simmons

Jill Brown

John Cenatiempo

Bob Colletti

Judy Hou

Angela Meryl

Christopher Place

Caroline Vexler

Scott Burik

Victor Chan

Blaise Corrigan

Carmel Rnee Macklin

Melissa Morgan

Elliot Santiago Associate Producer Geoff Hansen

Art Director Peter Rogness

Set Decorator Ellen Christiansen de Jonge

Property Master Sandy Hamilton

Script Supervisor Michael Taylor

Production Accountant Joan Altman

Production Coordinator Angela Quiles

“A” Camera Operator Craig Haagensen

“B” Camera Operator Bruce MacCallum

First Assistant “A” Camera Eric Swanek

First Assistant “B” Camera Andrew Priestley

Second Assistant “A” Camera Michael Cambria

Second Assistant “B” Camera Caesar S. Carnevale

Camera Loader Travis Cadalzo

Steadicam Operators Jeff Muhlstock

Kyle Rudolph

Assistant Costume Designers Christopher Peterson

MaryAnn D. Smith

Susan Kowarsh Hall

Costume Supervisors Gail A. Fitzgibbons

Thomas M. Beall

Head Tailors James Nadeaux

Marit Aagaard

Georgette Cogniat

Key Costumers Jill E. Anderson

Christine C. Schultz

Costumers Vern Malone

Kenn Hamilton

Kate Quinlan

Nicole Evangelista

Suzanne Kelly

Del Miskie

Susan Gomez

Department Head Makeup Judy Chin

Key Makeup Artist Margie Durand

Makeup Artists Claus Lulla

Louise McCarthy

Angela Johnson

Department Head Hair Nathan J. Busch

Key Hair Stylist Jerry DeCarlo

Hair Stylists Jacqueline Payne

John James

Stephen G. Bishop

Chief Lighting Technician John DeBlau

Assistant Chief Lighting Technician Tom Percarpio

Generator Operator Roberto Jimenez

 

Electricians Thomas J. Landi

Peter Colavito

Robert A. Falcone

Christopher De Blau

William Callahan

Susan Heller

Key Rigging Gaffer William Hines

Best Boy Rigging Electric Michael Gallart

Key Grip Mitchell Lillian

Best Boy Grip Paul Candrilli

Dolly Grips Rick Marroquin

Andrew Cheung

Grips Graham Klatt

Melvin Pukowsky

Brent A. Poleski

Thomas Kempf

Eric P. Robinson

Christopher Graneto

Francis Leach

Key Rigging Grip Jim Boniece

Best Boy Rigging Grip Michael A. McFadden

Production Mixer Tod Maitland

Boom Operator Kira Smith

Utility Sound T.R. Boyce, Jr.

24 Track Playback Engineer John Grasso

Protools Operator Daniel Pagan

Video Assist Kevin McKenna

Special Effects Supervisor Steve Kirshoff

Special Effects Coordinator Mark Bero

Special Effects Foreman Wilfred Caban

Special Effects Technicians Frank Oliva

Lewis Gluck

Johann Kunz

Thomas L. Viviano

Location Manager Robert T. Striem

Assistant Location Managers Damon Gordon

Pat Weber Sones

Patty Carey-Perazzo

Location Coordinator Marisa Vrooman

Location Unit Manager Mark Curley

Parking Coordinator Derek Pastures

Assistant Parking Coordinator Garrett Pastures

Assistant Production Coordinator Nick Thomason

Production Secretary Kirstin Liu

1st Assistant Accountant Yu-cheng Hsieh

Assistant Accountants Susan L. Strine

Michael Meere

Stephen Lippross

Payroll Accountant Felix Chen

Construction Accountant Jeremy Pratt

Construction Coordinator Nick Miller

Stage Manager Anouk Frˆsch

Key Shop Craftsman Gordon Krause

Foreman Shop Craftsman Robert A. Vaccariello

Scenery Automation Foreman Bill Ballou

Shop Craft Foremen Derrick Alford

Robert DiGrigoli

Welding Shop Foreman Dennis A. Young

Standby Carpenter John F. McHugh

Charge Scenic Artist Elizabeth Linn

Scenic Foreman Lauren Doner

Greens Foreman Gilbert H. Gertsen

Standby Greens Nicholas Hill

Assistant Art Directors Adam Stockenhausen

Deborah L. Jensen

Kim Jennings

Mark Pollard

Miguel Lopez-Castillo

Art Department Coordinator Kay Michaels

Storyboard Artist Lorenzo Contessa

Graphic Artists Leo Holder

Sarah Frank

Art Department Researcher Alex Digerlando

Assistant Set Decorator Rena Deangelo

Set Decorating Coordinator Dawn Masi

Leadman Timothy Metzger

On-Set Dressers Jo Ann Atwood

Ryan Webb

Set Dresser Harvey Goldberg

Roman Greller

Steven Duke

Janine Pesce

Joseph Taglairino

Paul Weathered

Eric Metzger

Buyer Carrie Stewart

Assistant Property Masters Kris Moran

Eric Cheripka

Ann L. Edgeworth

Puppet Master Paul Rice

 

Puppet Team Barbara Pollitt

Tim Hawkins

Susan Pitocchi

Jane Snow

Mari Tobita

Unit Publicist Frances Fiore

Still Photographer Abbot Genser

2nd Second Assistant Directors Kathleen E. Kearney

Daniela Barbosa

DGA Trainee Daniel E. Fernandez

Executive Assistant for Ms. Taymor and Mr. Goldenthal Jules Cazedessus

Assistant to Ms. Taymor Vivian Tse

Assistants to Ms. Jennifer Todd Melissa Wells

Patrick Brennan

Assistant to Ms. Suzanne Todd Julianna Hays

Assistant to Mr. Newirth Dawn Clounch

Assistant to Mr. Dauchy Grant Myers

Assistant to Mr. Simmons Melissa Cates

Production Assistants Patrick McDonald

Nora Ashkar

Roberto DeJesus

Ashley Duch

Betty Escobar

Ryan Ferguson

Marta Forns-EscudÈ

Evan Gabriele

Matthew Gavin

Abi Jackson

Matthew Landfield

Elizabeth MacSwan

Melissa H. Morgan

Gine Lui Ng

Adam Noily

Brendan O’Brien

Danny O’Brien

Cynthia Penaranda

Heather Prendergast

Christopher Rodriguez

Javier Rodriguez

Patrick Sarni

Luke J. Smith

Christian Vendetti

Jelani Atu Wilson

Derek Wimble

Caleb Wisdorf

Marisa Wu

Casting Associate Tiffany Little Canfield

Casting Assistants Evan Crothers

Stephanie Yankwitt

Background Casting Grant Wilfley Casting

Assistant Choreographers Erin Elliott

Sandy Chase

Dialect Coach Stephen Gabis

Medic Richard Fellagara

Transportation Captain James P. Whalen, Jr.

Transportation Co-Captain Timothy Shannon

Picture Car Coordinator Tommy Allen

Assistant Picture Car Coordinator David Allen

DRIVERS

Thomas J. Baker John Black

Howard Brooks Mike Buckman

Joseph J. Buonocore Ryan P. Cooke

Robert Dwyer Robert Fennimore

Roy Fortier Steven Haber

Thomas J. Horvath Matthew A. Mamola

Mickey Pastoriza

 

POST PRODUCTION

Sound Designer / Supervising Sound Editor Blake Leyh

Re-recording Mixers Lee Dichter

Robert Fernandez

Post Production Supervisor Jeff Robinson

Associate Editor Bob Allen

Visual Effects Editor Christopher Patterson

Dailies Assistant Joe Hobeck

Apprentice Editor Libby Thomas

Editorial Production Assistant Pedro Koss

Dialogue Editor Eliza Paley

ADR Editor Deborah Wallach

Foley Supervisor Wyatt Sprague

Assistant Sound Editor Igor Nikolic

Assistant ADR Editor E. Lee McAllister

Assistant Sound Editor Alex Soto

Foley Artist Marko Costanzo

Foley Mixer George Lara

Sound Re-Recordist Shane Stoneback

ADR Mixer Bobby Johanson

ADR Recordist Krissopher Chevannes

Loop Group SPEAKEASY

Post Production Facility Sound One

Dance Foley Footsteps Post Production Sound

Vocal Supervision by Paul Bogaev

On-Set Vocal Supervision by Lou Bellofatto

Supervising Music Producer Teese Gohl

Additional Production Secret Machines

Vocal Supervision Paul Bogaev

On-Set Vocal Supervision Lou Bellofatto

Supervising Music Producer Teese Gohl

Supervising Music Editor Curtis Roush

Music Editors Daryl B. Kell

Christopher S. Brooks

Music Recorded and Mixed by Joel Iwataki

Mike Piersante

Steve McLaughlin

Brandon Mason

Frank Filipetti

Emile Kelman

Jason Wormer

Stacy Parrish

Supervising Recording Engineer Lawrence Manchester

Programming Richard Martinez

Music Preparation Mark Baechle

Juan Mantilla

Music Contractors Antoine Silverman

Sandra Park

Jackie Presti

Ivy Skoff

Music Coordinators Angie Teo

Alex Horwitz

Justin Reeve

Lisa Surber

Vanessa Parr

Vocal Coach Jim Carson

Orchestrations Elliot Goldenthal

Robert Elhai

Conductor Jonathan Sheffer

Gear Rental Jim Flynn

Music Recorded and Mixed at Legacy Recording, New York, NY

Manhattan Center, New York, NY

The Village, Los Angeles, CA

Brooklyn Recording, New York, NY

Featured Vocalists Evan Rachel Wood

Jim Sturgess

Joe Anderson

Dana Fuchs

Martin Luther McCoy

T.V. Carpio

Off-Camera Vocals Ollabelle

Featured Off-Camera Musicians

LA BAND NY BAND

Carl Azar Benjamin Curtis

Jay Bellerose Brandon Curtis

Stephen Bruton Caroline Dale

T Bone Burnett Charley Drayton

Robert Carlisle Josh Garza

Keefus Ciancia Gil Goldstein

Daniel Higgins Page Hamilton

Jim Keltner Mark Stewart

Patrick Warren Bruce Williamson

T-Bone Walk

Bernie Worrell

Additional Off-Camera Musicians Joe Bongiorno

Peter Calo

Ronnie Cuber

Mike Elizondo

Teese Gohl

Elliot Goldenthal

Rich King

Howard Levy

Martin Luther

Marc Mann

Rick Martinez

Brian Mitchell†

Pancho Navarro

Marcus Rojas

Michael Roth

Antoine Silverman

Anja Wood

Digital Intermediate by EFILM

Digital Color Timer Yvan Lucas

Digital Intermediate Producer Josh Haynie

Digital Intermediate Editor Lisa Tutunjian

Negative Cutter Mo Henry

Visual Effects Producer Friend M. Wells

Visual Effects Coordinator Melinka Thompson-Godoy

Visual Effects Assistant Coordinator Rene Sekula

Titles and Animation Sequences Designed by Prologue

Producers Seth Kleinberg

Petra Holtorf-Stratton

Unjoo Byars

Carsten Becker

Alex Dervin

Design and Animation Heebok Lee

Samson Kao

Gary Mau

Dave Rindner

Dong Ho Lee

James Choi

Lindsay Mayer-Beug

Blake Sweeney

Lead Compositor Anthony Mabin

Compositors Young Joon Mok

Edie Paul

Justine Whitehead

Storyboard Artists Aaron Becker

Clarice Chin

Simon Clowes

Keith Cooper

Alex Hanson

Graham Hill

Katie Lee

Stephen Schuster

Raffi Simonian

Danny Yount

Editors Nathaniel Park

Hal Honigsberg

Frantic Films

VFX Supervisor Michael Shand

VFX Producer Robert Schajer

CG Supervisor Kert Gartner

2D Supervisor Christine Albers

Compositing Lead Jason Booth

Compositors George Taylor

Anne Kim

Tom Leckie

Jared Barber

Yves Tremblay

3D Supervisor Matt Broeska

Lighting & Rendering Jonathan Reynolds

Jason Pennington

Chris Pember

Blair Werschler

Nathan Mitchell

Paul Jakovich

Greg Petchkovsky

Torbjorn Olsson

Modelling Brent Breedveld

On-Set Survey Jane Sharvina

The FX Cartel

VFX Supervisor Gunnar Hansen

VFX Producers ChloÎ Grysole

Katie Wells

VFX Coordinator Angela De Palma

Art Director Kun Chang

George Fok

Meinert Hansen

CG Supervisor Charles Le Guen

3D Tracking Jean-FranÁois Morissette

Digital Compositors Etienne Daigle

Martin Ciastko

Peter O’Connell

Amoeba Proteus

VFX Supervisors Jeremy Dawson

Dan Schrecker

Carl’s Fine Films

Creative Supervisor Carl Willat

Animation Supervisor David Brandt

Compositor Colin Miller

VFX Producer Sandra Kimberly

Eden FX

Digital Artists Dave Morton

John Teska

VFX Producer Andrea D’Amico

VFX Coordinator Samantha Mabie-Tuinstra

HimAnI Productions, Inc.

VFX Supervisor Kevin Kutchaver

Ockham’s Razor

VFX Supervisor Brian Battles

Previsualization by Proof Inc.

Supervisor Ron Frankel

Lead Louise Baker

Animator Monty Granito

Local MoCo Assistant Camera John Clemmens

Local Intelligent Playback Dave Zimmern

Additional Visual Effects by

Electric Effects

Gray Matter VFX

Mokko Studio

Pacific Title & Art Studio

Pixel Magic

LIVERPOOL UNIT

UK Line Producer David Brown

Second Assistant Director Toby Hosking

Art Director Mark Raggett

Set Decorator Caroline Smith

Property Master Allen John Polley

Steadicam Operator Vince McGohan

First Assistant “A” Camera Carlos De Carvahlo

First Assistant “B” Camera Tim Battersby

Costume Supervisor Nigel Egerton

Wardrobe Master Chris Bradshaw

Chief Lighting Technician Chuck Finch

Rigging Gaffer Tom Finch

Key Grip Jim Crowther

Second Grip Gary Romaine

Special Effects Evan Green-Hughes

Location Manager Ken Hawkins

Unit Manager Mally Chung

Production Office Coordinator Isobel Thomas

Assistant Production Coordinator Nina Boardman

Production Secretary Cassandre Khoury

Production Accountant Dianne Twiddy

Construction Coordinator Jason Barker

Transportation Captain Gerry Gore

Soundtrack on Interscope Records

MUSIC

“Girl”

Written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney

“Helter Skelter”

Written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney

“Hold Me Tight”

Written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney

“All My Loving”

Written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney

“I Want To Hold Your Hand”

Written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney

“With A Little Help From My Friends”

Written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney

“It Won’t Be Long”

Written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney

“I’ve Just Seen A Face”

Written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney

“Let It Be”

Written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney

“Come Together”

Written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney

Performed by Joe Cocker

Joe Cocker appears courtesy of Universal Music Enterprises,

a division of UMG Recordings, Inc.

and EMI Records Limited

“Why Don’t We Do It In The Road”

Written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney

“If I Fell”

Written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney

“I Want You (She’s So Heavy)”

Written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney

“Dear Prudence”

Written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney

“Flying”

Written by John Lennon, Paul McCartney,

George Harrison and Ringo Starr

Produced by Elliot Goldenthal, Benjamin Curtis,

Brandon Curtis and Josh Garza

Performed by Secret Machines

Secret Machines appears courtesy of Warner Bros. Records

“Blue Jay Way”

Written by George Harrison

Produced by Elliot Goldenthal, Benjamin Curtis,

Brandon Curtis and Josh Garza

Performed by Secret Machines

Secret Machines appears courtesy of Warner Bros. Records

“I Am The Walrus”

Written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney

Produced by Elliot Goldenthal, Benjamin Curtis,

Brandon Curtis and Josh Garza

Performed by Bono and Secret Machines

Bono appears courtesy of Universal-Island Records Ltd.

Secret Machines appears courtesy of Warner Bros. Records

“Being For The Benefit Of Mr. Kite”

Written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney

“Because”

Written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney

“Something”

Written by George Harrison

“Oh! Darling”

Written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney

“Strawberry Fields Forever”

Written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney

“Revolution”

Written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney

“While My Guitar Gently Weeps”

Written by George Harrison

“Across The Universe”

Written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney

“And I Love Her”

Written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney

“Happiness Is A Warm Gun”

Written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney

“A Day In The Life”

Written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney

Performed by George Martin featuring Jeff Beck

Courtesy of The Echo Label Limited

“Blackbird”

Written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney

“Hey Jude”

Written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney

“Don’t Let Me Down”

Written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney

“All You Need Is Love”

Written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney

“Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds”

Written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney

Performed by Bono

Bono appears courtesy of Universal-Island Records Ltd.

 

© 2007 Revolution Studios Distribution Company, LLC.

All Rights Reserved

Revolution Studios Distribution Company, LLC is the author of this film

(motion picture) for the purpose of copyright and other laws.

 

Production Services in the United Kingdom provided by Sound Film Limited

Filmed in part at Steiner Studios

“NBC News Footage” Courtesy of NBC Archives

Footage Courtesy of BBC Motion Gallery

License granted by Intellectual Properties Management, Atlanta, Georgia as exclusive licensor of The King Estate.

 

 

Special Thanks to

The New York City Mayor’s Office of Film, Theatre and Broadcasting

The New York State Governor’s Office For Motion Picture & TV Development

The Palisades Interstate Park Commission, Bear Mountain, New York

Westchester County Film Office and The County of Westchester

City of Yonkers Office of Film & Television Development

The Bread and Puppet Theater

The Cavern Club

Lian Lunson

MADE IN NY

NY Film

 

Filmed with

PANAVISIONÆ

Cameras & Lenses

Prints by DELUXE Æ

MPAA Globe #42759 I.A.T.S.E. KODAK

 

DOLBY-Digital SDDS DTS

This is a work of fiction. The characters, incidents, and locations portrayed and the names herein are fictitious, and any similarity to or identification with the location, name, character or history of any person, product or entity is entirely coincidental and unintentional.

American Humane monitored the animal action. (AHA 01451)

This motion picture photoplay is protected pursuant to the provisions of the laws of the United States of America and other countries. Any unauthorized duplication and/or distribution of this photoplay may result in civil liability and criminal prosecution.

RELEASED BY

COLUMBIA PICTURES

A SONY PICTURES ENTERTAINMENT COMPANY

Rating PG-13

 

 

ACROSS THE UNIVERSE”

Dirigida por

Julie Taymor

GuiÛn de

Dick Clement & Ian La Frenais

Historia de

Julie Taymor & Dick Clement & Ian La Frenais

Producida por

Suzanne Todd

Jennifer Todd

Producida por

Matthew Gross

Productores Ejecutivos

Derek Dauchy

Rudd Simmons

Charles Newirth

Director de FotografÌa

Bruno Delbonnel, A.F.C.

DiseÒador de ProducciÛn

Mark Friedberg

Editor

FranÁoise Bonnot, A.C.E.

DiseÒador de Vestuario

Albert Wolsky

Canciones Escritas por

John Lennon y Paul McCartney

y por George Harrison

“Flying” por John Lennon, Paul McCartney,

George Harrison y Ringo Starr

Canciones Producidas por

T Bone Burnett

Elliot Goldenthal

Teese Gohl

Banda Original de

Elliot Goldenthal

Evan Rachel Wood

Jim Sturgess

Joe Anderson

Dana Fuchs

Martin Luther McCoy

T. V. Carpio

Casting por

Bernard Telsey, CSA

CoreografÌa de

Daniel Ezralow

Supervisor de Efectos Visuales

Peter Crossman

Secuencias de AnimaciÛn

Kyle Cooper

Supervisor Musical

Denise Luiso

Co-Productores

Richard Baratta

Ben Haber

Una ProducciÛn de Matthew Gross / Team Todd

Una PresentaciÛn de Revolution Studios

Una PelÌcula de Julie Taymor

Gerente Unidad de ProducciÛn Richard Baratta

Gerente Unidad de ProducciÛn Pamela Thur-Weir

Primer Asistente al Director Geoff Hansen

Segundo Asistente al Director Danielle Rigby

Elenco

Lucy Evan Rachel Wood

Jude Jim Sturgess

Max Carrigan Joe Anderson

Sadie Dana Fuchs

Jo-Jo Martin Luther McCoy

Prudence T.V. Carpio

Daniel Spencer Liff

Novia en Liverpool de Jude Lisa Hogg

Cyril Nicholas Lumley

Phil Michael Ryan

Mam· de Jude Angela Mounsey

Entrenador de Animadores Erin Elliott

Pap· de Jude Robert Clohessy

Amigos de Cuarto Christopher Tierney

Curtis Holbrook

John Jeffrey Martin

Matt Caplan

Jock T.R. Boyce, Jr.

Mesera de taberna Aisha De Haas

Leah Hocking

Hombre Viejo en Taberna Bill Buell

Hermana de Lucy Ellen Hornberger

Emily Amanda Cole

Novia de la Secundaria Danya Taymor

Pap· de Lucy Dylan Baker

Mam· de Lucy Linda Emond

Abuela Carrigan Lynn Cohen

TÌo Teddy Bill Irwin

Mam· de Daniel Jennifer Van Dyck

Hermano de Jo-Jo Timothy T. Mitchum

Cantante de Gospel Carol Woods

Mam· de Jo-Jo Elain Graham

Prostitutas Orfeh

Antonique Smith

Tracy Nicole Chapman

Yassmin Alers

Deidre Goodwin

Bum/Pimp/Hippie Loco Joe Cocker

Empleados Revista de Rap Jacob Pitts

Staceyanne Chin

Dani Jeanine Serralles

Mesero de Katz Leonard Tucker

PolicÌa del DepÛsito del Muelle Daniel Stewart Sherman

Sargento del Ejercito Harry Lennix

Paco Logan Marshall-Green

Manejador de Sadie James Urbaniak

Trabajador SDR Kathleen Early

Luna Park Ching Valdes-Aran

Dr. Robert Bono

Madre Superiora Daniel Ezralow

Chicas de Max Kiva Dawson

Halley Wegryn Gross

Bromistas Luther Creek

Jerzy Gwiazdowski

Arabella Holzbog

Ambrose Martos

Peter Mui

Karine Plantadit

Dan Weltner

Christopher Youngsman

Sr. Kite Eddie Izzard

Rita Ekaterina Sknarina

Gerente de Fillmore Tracy Westmoreland

Pantera Negra Ron Cephas Jones

Sargento de la Casa del Precinto W. W. Wilson III

Enfermera Cantante Salma Hayek

Vagabundo Golpeando BaterÌa en Bin Lids Luke Cresswell

Barman del Bar de Max Jarlath Conroy

Cantantes de Sadie Mandy Gonzales

Destan Owens

Cicily Daniels

Saycon Sengbloh

Sargentos En Terraza Sam Kitchin

Chris McGarry

Guardia de Puerta en Estudios Strawberry Frank Hopf

Como …l Mismo Cousin Brucie Morrow

Amigas de Secundaria Navarra Novy-Williams

Sarah Jayne Jensen

Michelle Lookadoo

Banda de Baile de Secundaria Geoffrey Countryman

Julien Joy

Conrad Korsch

Brian McKenna

Jack Petricelli

Banda de Sadie Timothy Keiper

Arthur Lewis

Mark Lewis

Bryan Noll

Banda de Circus Michael Arenella

Cyro Baptista

Frank Fighera

Ritt Henn

Mark Stewart

Bruce Williamson

Banda de Terraza de Sadie Charles Drayton

Thomas Grasso

Joey Sykes

Paul Wallfisch

Coro de Gospel

Caryn Allen Ronald Blackman

Erik Justin Gaines Marlene Mason

Tanisha Mason Cheryl McClurkin

Donald A. McClurkin, Sr. Lorna McClurkin

Olivia McClurkin Terrell Middleton

Jada Scott Murl Smith

Jor-El Wharton Devin Wharwood

Alyssa Woodside Christina Woodside

Bailarines

Marcus Bellamy Tim Acito

Andrew Asnes Kevin Aubin

Collin Baja Michael Balderama

Charissa Barton Nicole Berger

Adolpho Blaire Brian Brooks

Enrique Brown Shawn Burgess

Ian Carney Sandy Chase

Ron De Jesus Jean Emile

Billy Fagen Angelo Fraboni

Kathryn Fraggos Kurt Froman

Bob Gaynor Chris Ghelfi

Tyler Gilstrap Greg Graham

Cody Green Matthew Hamel

Sean Martin Hingston Ryan Holly

Dell Howlett Terace Jones

Dominique Kelley Ryan Kelly

Mari Koda Jason Lacayo

Abdul Latif Marty Lawson

Yasmine C. Lee Brian Letendr

Tiger Martina Tim McGarrigal

Allie Meixner Dario Mejia

Angel Morales Matthew Neff

Leah O’Donnell Rika Okamoto

Patrick O’Neill Adesola Osakalumi

Danny Paschall Nathan Peck

Giovanni Perez Bobby Pestka

Kyle Pleasant Avery Ragsdale

Desmond S. Richardson Samuel Roberts

Alberto Dister Rondon Natsumi Sakurai

Luis Salgado Martin Samuel

Marcos Santana John Selya

Ying-Ying Shiau Todd Michel Smith

Jonah Spear Jordan Spencer

Matthew Steffens Dennis Stowe

Stacey Sund Christopher W. Tierney

Lara Tinari Michael Tracy

Andrew Turteltaub Nicole Wolcott

Wenshuan Yang Kenneth Ziegler

Coordinador de Dobles George Aguilar

Co-Coordinador de Dobles Stephen Pope

Coordinador Marino Chris Barnes

Dobles

Bobby Beckles

Nicole Callender

Liisa Cohen

Jeffrey Lee Gibsun

Tina McKissick

Judi Lewis Ockler

Derrick Simmons

Jill Brown

John Cenatiempo

Bob Colletti

Judy Hou

Angela Meryl

Christopher Place

Caroline Vexler

Scott Burik

Victor Chan

Blaise Corrigan

Carmel Rnee Macklin

Melissa Morgan

Elliot Santiago Productor Asociado Geoff Hansen

Director de Arte Peter Rogness

Decorador de Sets Ellen Christiansen de Jonge

Encargado de Ubicar Objetos en el Set Sandy Hamilton

Supervisor de GuiÛn Michael Taylor

Contador de ProducciÛn Joan Altman

Coordinador de ProducciÛn Angela Quiles

Operador C·mara “A” Craig Haagensen

Operador C·mara “B” Bruce MacCallum

Primer Asistente C·mara “A” Eric Swanek

Primer Asistente C·mara “B” Andrew Priestley

Segundo Asistente C·mara “A” Michael Cambria

Segundo Asistente C·mara “B” Caesar S. Carnevale

Recargador de C·mara Travis Cadalzo

Operadores Steadicam Jeff Muhlstock

Kyle Rudolph

DiseÒadores de Vestuario Asistentes Christopher Peterson

MaryAnn D. Smith

Susan Kowarsh Hall

Supervisores de Vestuarios Gail A. Fitzgibbons

Thomas M. Beall

Sastre Principal James Nadeaux

Marit Aagaard

Georgette Cogniat

Vestuaristas Principales Jill E. Anderson

Christine C. Schultz

Vestuaristas Vern Malone

Kenn Hamilton

Kate Quinlan

Nicole Evangelista

Suzanne Kelly

Del Miskie

Susan Gomez

Cabeza Departamento de Maquillaje Judy Chin

Artista Principal de Maquillaje Margie Durand

Artistas de Maquillaje Claus Lulla

Louise McCarthy

Angela Johnson

Cabeza Departamento Peinados Nathan J. Busch

Estilista Principal Jerry DeCarlo

Estilistas Jacqueline Payne

John James

Stephen G. Bishop

TÈcnico en Jefe de IluminaciÛn John DeBlau

Asistente al TÈcnico en Jefe de IluminaciÛn Tom Percarpio

Operador de Generador Roberto Jimenez

 

Electricistas Thomas J. Landi

Peter Colavito

Robert A. Falcone

Christopher De Blau

William Callahan

Susan Heller

Electricidad Principal William Hines

Ayudante al Electricidad Principal Michael Gallart

Coordinador del Personal de ProducciÛn Mitchell Lillian

Ayudante al Coordinador del Personal de ProducciÛn Paul Candrilli

Personal de ProducciÛn a Cargo del

Movimiento de C·mara Rick Marroquin

Andrew Cheung

Personal de ProducciÛn Graham Klatt

Melvin Pukowsky

Brent A. Poleski

Thomas Kempf

Eric P. Robinson

Christopher Graneto

Francis Leach

Coordinador Principal del Personal de ProducciÛn Jim Boniece

Ayudante al Coordinador Principal del

Personal de ProducciÛn Michael A. McFadden

Mezclador de ProducciÛn Tod Maitland

Operador de MicrÛfono Kira Smith

Sonido Utilitario T.R. Boyce, Jr.

Ingeniero ReproducciÛn de 24 Pistas John Grasso

Operador Protools Daniel Pagan

Asistencia de Video Kevin McKenna

Supervisor Efectos Especiales Steve Kirshoff

Coordinador Efectos Especiales Mark Bero

Encargado Efectos Especiales Wilfred Caban

TÈcnicos Efectos Especiales Frank Oliva

Lewis Gluck

Johann Kunz

Thomas L. Viviano

Gerente de Locaciones Robert T. Striem

Asistentes al Gerente de Locaciones Damon Gordon

Pat Weber Sones

Patty Carey-Perazzo

Coordinador de Locaciones Marisa Vrooman

Gerente Unidad de Locaciones Mark Curley

Coordinador de Estacionamiento Derek Pastures

Asistente al Coordinador de Estacionamiento Garrett Pastures

Asistente al Coordinador de ProducciÛn Nick Thomason

Secretaria de ProducciÛn Kirstin Liu

1er Asistente Contador Yu-cheng Hsieh

Contadores Asistentes Susan L. Strine

Michael Meere

Stephen Lippross

Contador A Cargo de Sueldos Felix Chen

Contador de ConstrucciÛn Jeremy Pratt

Coordinador de ConstrucciÛn Nick Miller

Gerente de Escenario Anouk Frˆsch

Artesano Principal Gordon Krause

Encargado Tienda de ArtesanÌa Robert A. Vaccariello

Encargado de AutomatizaciÛn EscÈnica Bill Ballou

Encargados de Tienda de Trabajos Derrick Alford

Robert DiGrigoli

Encargado Equipo de Soldadura Dennis A. Young

Carpintero Suplente John F. McHugh

Artista de Recarga EscÈnica Elizabeth Linn

Encargado EscÈnico Lauren Doner

Encargado de Paisajes Gilbert H. Gertsen

Paisajistas Suplentes Nicholas Hill

Asistentes al Director de Arte Adam Stockenhausen

Deborah L. Jensen

Kim Jennings

Mark Pollard

Miguel Lopez-Castillo

Coordinador Departamento de Arte Kay Michaels

Artistas de Bocetos Lorenzo Contessa

Artistas Gr·ficos Leo Holder

Sarah Frank

Investigador Departamento de Arte Alex Digerlando

Decorador de Sets Asistente Rena Deangelo

Coordinador DecoraciÛn de Sets Dawn Masi

LÌder Timothy Metzger

Vestuaristas en el Set Jo Ann Atwood

Ryan Webb

Vestuaristas del Set Harvey Goldberg

Roman Greller

Steven Duke

Janine Pesce

Joseph Taglairino

Paul Weathered

Eric Metzger

Comprador Carrie Stewart

Asistente al Encargado de Ubicar Objetos en el Set Kris Moran

Eric Cheripka

Ann L. Edgeworth

Encargado de TÌteres Paul Rice

 

Equipo de Titiriteros Barbara Pollitt

Tim Hawkins

Susan Pitocchi

Jane Snow

Mari Tobita

Publicista de la Unidad Frances Fiore

FotÛgrafo Tomas Quietas Abbot Genser

2do Segundo Asistente al Director Kathleen E. Kearney

Daniela Barbosa

Entrenador DGA Daniel E. Fernandez

Asistente Ejecutivo para la Sra. Taymor y el Sr. Goldenthal Jules Cazedessus

Asistente para la Sra. Taymor Vivian Tse

Asistentes para la Sra. Jennifer Todd Melissa Wells

Patrick Brennan

Asistente para la Sra. Suzanne Todd Julianna Hays

Asistente para el Sr. Newirth Dawn Clounch

Asistente para el Sr. Dauchy Grant Myers

Asistente para el Sr. Simmons Melissa Cates

Asistentes de ProducciÛn Patrick McDonald

Nora Ashkar

Roberto DeJesus

Ashley Duch

Betty Escobar

Ryan Ferguson

Marta Forns-EscudÈ

Evan Gabriele

Matthew Gavin

Abi Jackson

Matthew Landfield

Elizabeth MacSwan

Melissa H. Morgan

Gine Lui Ng

Adam Noily

Brendan O’Brien

Danny O’Brien

Cynthia Penaranda

Heather Prendergast

Christopher Rodriguez

Javier Rodriguez

Patrick Sarni

Luke J. Smith

Christian Vendetti

Jelani Atu Wilson

Derek Wimble

Caleb Wisdorf

Marisa Wu

Asociada al Casting Tiffany Little Canfield

Asistentes al Casting Evan Crothers

Stephanie Yankwitt

Casting para el Fondo Grant Wilfley Casting

CoreÛgrafos Asistentes Erin Elliott

Sandy Chase

Entrenador de Dialecto Stephen Gabis

MÈdico Richard Fellagara

Capit·n de Transporte James P. Whalen, Jr.

Co-Capit·n de Transporte Timothy Shannon

Coordinador de Pintado de Autos Tommy Allen

Asistente al Coordinador de Pintado de Autos David Allen

CHOFERES

Thomas J. Baker John Black

Howard Brooks Mike Buckman

Joseph J. Buonocore Ryan P. Cooke

Robert Dwyer Robert Fennimore

Roy Fortier Steven Haber

Thomas J. Horvath Matthew A. Mamola

Mickey Pastoriza

 

POST PRODUCCI”N

DiseÒador de Sonido / Editor de Sonido Supervisor Blake Leyh

Mezcladores de Re-Grabado Lee Dichter

Robert Fernandez

Supervisor de Post ProducciÛn Jeff Robinson

Editor Asociado Bob Allen

Editor Efectos Visuales Christopher Patterson

Asistente Diario Joe Hobeck

Editor Aprendiz Libby Thomas

Asistente ProducciÛn Editorial Pedro Koss

Editor Di·logos Eliza Paley

Editor ADR Deborah Wallach

Supervisor Sonidos de Fondo Wyatt Sprague

Asistente al Editor de Sonido Igor Nikolic

Asistente al Editor ADR E. Lee McAllister

Asistente al Editor de Sonido Alex Soto

Artista de Sonidos de Fondo Marko Costanzo

Mezclador de Sonidos de Fondo George Lara

Re-grabador de Sonido Shane Stoneback

Mezclador ADR Bobby Johanson

Grabador ADR Krissopher Chevannes

Grupo de Loop SPEAKEASY

Instalaciones de Post ProducciÛn Sound One

Sonidos de Fondo de Baile Footsteps Post Production Sound

SupervisiÛn Vocal por Paul Bogaev

SupervisiÛn Vocal en el Set por Lou Bellofatto

Productor Musical Supervisor Teese Gohl

ProducciÛn Adicional Secret Machines

SupervisiÛn Vocal Paul Bogaev

SupervisiÛn Vocal en el Set Lou Bellofatto

Productor Musical Supervisor Teese Gohl

Editor Musical Supervisor Curtis Roush

Editores Musicales Daryl B. Kell

Christopher S. Brooks

M·sica Grabada y Mezclada por Joel Iwataki

Mike Piersante

Steve McLaughlin

Brandon Mason

Frank Filipetti

Emile Kelman

Jason Wormer

Stacy Parrish

Ingeniero Supervisor de Grabado Lawrence Manchester

ProgramaciÛn Richard Martinez

PreparaciÛn Musical Mark Baechle

Juan Mantilla

Contratistas Musicales Antoine Silverman

Sandra Park

Jackie Presti

Ivy Skoff

Coordinadores Musicales Angie Teo

Alex Horwitz

Justin Reeve

Lisa Surber

Vanessa Parr

Entrenador Vocal Jim Carson

Orquestaciones Elliot Goldenthal

Robert Elhai

Conductor Jonathan Sheffer

Alquiler de Equipos Jim Flynn

M·sica Grabada y Mezclada en Legacy Recording, New York, NY

Manhattan Center, New York, NY

The Village, Los Angeles, CA

Brooklyn Recording, New York, NY

Vocalistas Presentes Evan Rachel Wood

Jim Sturgess

Joe Anderson

Dana Fuchs

Martin Luther McCoy

T.V. Carpio

Voces Fuera de C·mara Ollabelle

M·sicos Presentados Fuera de C·mara

LA BAND NY BAND

Carl Azar Benjamin Curtis

Jay Bellerose Brandon Curtis

Stephen Bruton Caroline Dale

T Bone Burnett Charley Drayton

Robert Carlisle Josh Garza

Keefus Ciancia Gil Goldstein

Daniel Higgins Page Hamilton

Jim Keltner Mark Stewart

Patrick Warren Bruce Williamson

T-Bone Walk

Bernie Worrell

M·sicos Fuera de C·mara Adicionales Joe Bongiorno

Peter Calo

Ronnie Cuber

Mike Elizondo

Teese Gohl

Elliot Goldenthal

Rich King

Howard Levy

Martin Luther

Marc Mann

Rick Martinez

Brian Mitchell†

Pancho Navarro

Marcus Rojas

Michael Roth

Antoine Silverman

Anja Wood

Intermedio Digital por EFILM

CronÛmetro Digital de Color Yvan Lucas

Productor del Intermedio Digital Josh Haynie

Editor Intermedio Digital Lisa Tutunjian

Cortador de Negativos Mo Henry

Productor Efectos Visuales Friend M. Wells

Coordinador Efectos Visuales Melinka Thompson-Godoy

Asistente al Coordinador Efectos Visuales Rene Sekula

TÌtulos y Secuencias de AnimaciÛn DiseÒados por Prologue

Productores Seth Kleinberg

Petra Holtorf-Stratton

Unjoo Byars

Carsten Becker

Alex Dervin

DiseÒo y AnimaciÛn Heebok Lee

Samson Kao

Gary Mau

Dave Rindner

Dong Ho Lee

James Choi

Lindsay Mayer-Beug

Blake Sweeney

Compositor Principal Anthony Mabin

Compositores Young Joon Mok

Edie Paul

Justine Whitehead

Artistas de Bocetos Aaron Becker

Clarice Chin

Simon Clowes

Keith Cooper

Alex Hanson

Graham Hill

Katie Lee

Stephen Schuster

Raffi Simonian

Danny Yount

Editores Nathaniel Park

Hal Honigsberg

Frantic Films

Supervisor VFX Michael Shand

Productor VFX Robert Schajer

Supervisor CG Kert Gartner

Supervisor 2D Christine Albers

ComposiciÛn Principal Jason Booth

Compositores George Taylor

Anne Kim

Tom Leckie

Jared Barber

Yves Tremblay

Supervisor 3D Matt Broeska

IluminaciÛn & Rendereado Jonathan Reynolds

Jason Pennington

Chris Pember

Blair Werschler

Nathan Mitchell

Paul Jakovich

Greg Petchkovsky

Torbjorn Olsson

Modelado Brent Breedveld

MediciÛn en el Set Jane Sharvina

El C·rtel FX

Supervisor Gunnar Hansen

Productores VFX ChloÎ Grysole

Katie Wells

Coordinador VFX Angela De Palma

Directores de Arte Kun Chang

George Fok

Meinert Hansen

Supervisor CG Charles Le Guen

Pistas 3D Jean-FranÁois Morissette

Compositores Digitales Etienne Daigle

Martin Ciastko

Peter O’Connell

Amoeba Proteus

Supervisores VFX Jeremy Dawson

Dan Schrecker

Carl’s Fine Films

Supervisor Creativo Carl Willat

Supervisor AnimaciÛn David Brandt

Compositor Colin Miller

Productor VFX Sandra Kimberly

Eden FX

Artistas Digitales Dave Morton

John Teska

Productor VFX Andrea D’Amico

Coordinador VFX Samantha Mabie-Tuinstra

HimAnI Productions, Inc.

Supervisor VFX Kevin Kutchaver

Ockham’s Razor

Supervisor VFX Brian Battles

PrevisualizaciÛn por Proof Inc.

Supervisor Ron Frankel

Principal Louise Baker

Animador Monty Granito

Asistente Local de C·mara de MoCo John Clemmens

ReproducciÛn Local Inteligente Dave Zimmern

Efectos Visuales Adicionales por

Electric Effects

Gray Matter VFX

Mokko Studio

Pacific Title & Art Studio

Pixel Magic

UNIDAD DE LIVERPOOL

Productor en LÌnea GB David Brown

Segundo Asistente al Director Toby Hosking

Director de Arte Mark Raggett

Decorador de Sets Caroline Smith

Encargado de Ubicar Objetos en el Set Allen John Polley

Operador Steadicam Vince McGohan

Primer Asistente C·mara “A” Carlos De Carvahlo

Primer Asistente C·mara “B” Tim Battersby

Supervisor de Vestuarios Nigel Egerton

Maestro de Ropero Chris Bradshaw

TÈcnico de IluminaciÛn en Jefe Chuck Finch

Electricidad Principal Tom Finch

Coordinador del Personal de ProducciÛn Jim Crowther

Coordinador del Personal de

ProducciÛn Segundo Gary Romaine

Efectos Especiales Evan Green-Hughes

Gerente de Locaciones Ken Hawkins

Gerente de la Unidad Mally Chung

Coordinador Oficina de ProducciÛn Isobel Thomas

Asistente al Coordinador Oficina de ProducciÛn Nina Boardman

Secretaria de ProducciÛn Cassandre Khoury

Contador de ProducciÛn Dianne Twiddy

Coordinador de ConstrucciÛn Jason Barker

Capit·n de Transporte Gerry Gore

Banda de Sonido en Interscope Records

M/SICA

“Girl”

Escrita por John Lennon y Paul McCartney

“Helter Skelter”

Escrita por John Lennon y Paul McCartney

“Hold Me Tight”

Escrita por John Lennon y Paul McCartney

“All My Loving”

Escrita por John Lennon y Paul McCartney

“I Want To Hold Your Hand”

Escrita por John Lennon y Paul McCartney

“With A Little Help From My Friends”

Escrita por John Lennon y Paul McCartney

“It Won’t Be Long”

Escrita por John Lennon y Paul McCartney

“I’ve Just Seen A Face”

Escrita por John Lennon y Paul McCartney

“Let It Be”

Escrita por John Lennon y Paul McCartney

“Come Together”

Escrita por John Lennon y Paul McCartney

Interpretada por Joe Cocker

ApariciÛn de Joe Cocker cortesÌa de Universal Music Enterprises,

una divisiÛn de UMG Recordings, Inc.

y EMI Records Limited

“Why Don’t We Do It In The Road”

Escrita por John Lennon y Paul McCartney

“If I Fell”

Escrita por John Lennon y Paul McCartney

“I Want You (She’s So Heavy)”

Escrita por John Lennon y Paul McCartney

“Dear Prudence”

Escrita por John Lennon y Paul McCartney

“Flying”

Escrita por John Lennon, Paul McCartney,

George Harrison y Ringo Starr

Producida por Elliot Goldenthal, Benjamin Curtis,

Brandon Curtis y Josh Garza

Interpretada por Secret Machines

ApariciÛn de Secret Machines cortesÌa de Warner Bros. Records

“Blue Jay Way”

Escrita por George Harrison

Producida por Elliot Goldenthal, Benjamin Curtis,

Brandon Curtis and Josh Garza

Interpretada por Secret Machines

ApariciÛn de Secret Machines cortesÌa de Warner Bros. Records

“I Am The Walrus”

Escrita por John Lennon y Paul McCartney

Producida por Elliot Goldenthal, Benjamin Curtis,

Brandon Curtis y Josh Garza

Interpretada por Bono and Secret Machines

ApariciÛn de Bono cortesÌa de Universal-Island Records Ltd.

ApariciÛn de Secret Machines cortesÌa de Warner Bros. Records

“Being For The Benefit Of Mr. Kite”

Escrita por John Lennon y Paul McCartney

“Because”

Escrita por John Lennon y Paul McCartney

“Something”

Escrita por George Harrison

“Oh! Darling”

Escrita por John Lennon y Paul McCartney

“Strawberry Fields Forever”

Escrita por John Lennon y Paul McCartney

“Revolution”

Escrita por John Lennon y Paul McCartney

“While My Guitar Gently Weeps”

Escrita por George Harrison

“Across The Universe”

Escrita por John Lennon y Paul McCartney

“And I Love Her”

Escrita por John Lennon y Paul McCartney

“Happiness Is A Warm Gun”

Escrita por John Lennon y Paul McCartney

“A Day In The Life”

Escrita por John Lennon y Paul McCartney

Interpretada por George Martin presentando a Jeff Beck

CortesÌa de The Echo Label Limited

“Blackbird”

Escrita por John Lennon y Paul McCartney

“Hey Jude”

Escrita por John Lennon y Paul McCartney

“Don’t Let Me Down”

Escrita por John Lennon y Paul McCartney

“All You Need Is Love”

Escrita por John Lennon y Paul McCartney

“Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds”

Escrita por John Lennon y Paul McCartney

Interpretada por Bono

ApariciÛn de Bono cortesÌa de Universal-Island Records Ltd.

 

© 2007 Revolution Studios Distribution Company, LLC.

Todos Los Derechos Reservados

Revolution Studios Distribution Company, LLC es el autor de esta pelÌcula

(largometraje) para los propÛsitos de derechos de autor y otras leyes.

 

Servicios de ProducciÛn en el Reino Unido proveÌdos por Sound Film Limited

Filmado en parte en Steiner Studios

“NBC News Footage” CortesÌa de los Archivos de la NBC

Material FÌlmico CortesÌa de la GalerÌa de Cine de la BBC

Licencias otorgadas por la Intellectual Properties Management, Atlanta, Georgia como licenciatario exclusivo de la Herencia de The King.

 

 

Especiales Agradecimientos a

La Oficina de Cine, Teatro y Coberturas del Alcalde de Nueva York

La Oficina de Largometrajes & Desarrollo Televisivo del Gobernador de Nueva York

La ComisiÛn Interestatal de Parques Palisades, Bear Mountain, Nueva York

Oficina de Cine del Condado de Westchester y al Condado de Westchester

Oficina de Cine & Desarrollo Televisivo de la Ciudad de Yonkers

El Teatro Bread and Puppet

El Club La Caberna

Lian Lunson

HECHA EN NY

NY Film

 

Filmada con

PANAVISIONÆ

C·maras & Lentes

Impresiones de DELUXE Æ

MPAA Globe #42759 I.A.T.S.E. KODAK

 

DOLBY-Digital SDDS DTS

Este es un trabajo de ficciÛn. Los personajes, incidentes, y locaciones representados y sus respectivos nombres son ficticios, y cualquier similitud o identificaciÛn con la locaciÛn, nombre, personaje o historia de cualquier persona, producto o entidad es enteramente una coincidencia y no intencional.

La acciÛn con animales fue monitoreada por la American Humane (AHA 01451)

Este largometraje est· protegida por las leyes de los Estados Unidos de NorteamÈrica y otros paÌses. Cualquier duplicaciÛn y/o distribuciÛn no autorizada de esta cinta puede resultar en acciones civiles y criminales.

ESTRENADA POR

COLUMBIA PICTURES

UNA COMPA—ÕA DE SONY PICTURES ENTERTAINMENT

ClasificaciÛn PG-13

 

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